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  1. I came across an EU funded project "xr4all" which provides a development environment(among other things) for XR projects. The details are here: https://dev.xr4all.eu Will it be possible for the NDT programme to provide similar platform for DT community in the UK? It will help in fostering rapid collaboration and development of the DT ecosystem. Thanks and kind regards, Ajeeth
  2. Dave Murray

    Test Engineering and DTs

    I am considering starting a network for topics related to Lifecycle V&V (Validation and Verification) centred on Evaluation and Testing, and this message is to poll the level of potential interest. I imagine the network would offer the following: · A place for Test Engineers from different market sectors to share experiences and gain knowledge · Support for those areas where DT activity is low but growing, the Defence Sector is an example, to benefit from the experiences of other sectors Test Engineers have a mix of technical and customer skills that are central to successful project implementation. The DT concept provides a lifecycle project-thread that provides Test Engineers with an unprecedented opportunity to exercise their skills. Maybe finding a way to maximise this opportunity might also attract more people to the career, and be a way to improve recruitment into the world of Engineering? If we launch this Network, would you consider joining it? Dave Murray
  3. RachelJudson

    Planning Golden Thread

    Click here for video As citizens and professionals we accept that the planning process is there to uphold standards of safety, aesthetic, technical and social requirements. However, the planning process has suffered from many years of tinkering and making good. We now have a planning process that is dependent on outdated approaches and incompatible with the rest of the development industry. It is slow, which presents problems in the UK where we need to build, a lot, quickly. Planning risks preventing this building from happening at pace and of a higher quality. This situation presents, of course, a golden opportunity for a fully digitised end-to-end process which could: reduce the planning bottleneck automate those parts of the process that can be Increase transparency of the process open up new means of engaging stakeholders with the planning process, by for example visualising proposed developments and so increasing understanding allow us to see projects in context, with other proposed developments, rather than in isolation allow access to, and sharing of, crucial data (like structural and fire safety information) facilitate the use of modern methods of construction most importantly, give a more accurate understanding of build costs and timescales In order to bring this about, we have to standardise and digitise (as far as it is possible and desirable) the rules under which designs are created, assessed, and ultimately built. At the same time we have to find ways to generate and use interoperable data. This problem is what the group from Bryden Wood, 3D Repo, London Borough of Southwark and CDBB have been working on. We have developed a model which is open and based on the established BIM Collaboration Framework (BCF). It presents the data associated with planning so that it can be queried and interrogated. You can see a summary in the video above and read more about it here; Planning Golden Thread statement attached below 3DRepo technical write up Bryden Wood technical write up Bryden Wood Schema We know that many of the barriers associated with a change like this will be cultural rather than technical so we are seeking partners in the planning and development system who would like to test the model and collaborators who would like to fund the next stage of development. Please get in touch! You can also hear more about this on the Gemini Call on Tuesday, 18 May at 10:30 with Miranda Sharp and Jack Ricketts of Southwark Council. Link to DT Hub Calendar
  4. Paul

    Estates Managment

    I’m just wondering if anyone has any examples of good estates management tools/systems which are not one of the big firms, Trimble, MRI... to name 2 off of the top of my head. Are there any small to medium sized options/vendors which cover rent/payments in & out, deeds/responsibilities, IRF16, areas, blocks, sites, etc., etc.? Or is it, buy big or do it yourself?
  5. I would like to open this Topic to know which technical possibilities do we have in the market to develop a Building Twin
  6. Webinar: Digital Twins in Water Utility Operations – Introducing OpenFlows WaterSight Bentley’s new water infrastructure digital twin solution, OpenFlows WaterSight, connects SCADA, GIS, hydraulic modeling, and customer information into a single interoperable dashboard. Register for this webinar to see how a scalable cloud-based environment can provide your entire utility access into the detection of critical system and individual asset performance information, enhancing operations and maintenance planning decisions. Bentley product success consultant Joel Johnson will share new ways to mirror and simulate current water-system conditions and performance, so you can: · Confidently share detailed graphics of current network performance, as well as the expected consequences and improvement for actions related to operational and maintenance activity · Monitor flow, pressure, and water quality conditions at every point in the system · Improve energy efficiency leveraging real-time analyses of each pump and tank, with alerts for when performance is outside of service thresholds. https://goto.webcasts.com/starthere.jsp?ei=1353076&tp_key=281cc43d58
  7. Webinar: Building Tomorrow’s Resilience: Why Digital Twins Are Shaping the Water Utility Status Quo Just how effective are digital twins in helping to identify critical points in your water and wastewater infrastructure—like a growing leak or an unexpected closed valve? Bentley product manager Ari Opdahl delves into the possibilities of predictive operational intelligence in this special WEF eShowcase. https://register.gotowebinar.com/recording/6892911365133001731
  8. The National Digital Twin programme is a national programme, built on consensus. As the open consultation on our proposed approach to an IMF draws to a close, Miranda Sharp IMF Engagement Lead at CDBB shares how the DT Hub members can continue to shape its development. We believe the IMF is the key to enabling secure, resilient data sharing between organisations and sectors in the built environment and want to work with you to devel0p it. Greater use of digital technologies and information in the built environment increases capacity, efficiency, reliability and resilience. This in turn enables existing assets to enhance service provision for people, as well as improving efficiency in design and delivery of new assets through a better understanding of whole-life performance of those assets already in place. We know that by working collaboratively with members of the DT Hub, who share in that vision, we will end up with a better end result. My role within the programme is to help make your voice heard, and to open conversations where you can ask the challenging questions we need to find answers to. During the next phase of the consultation we will be running in-depth interviews with practiti0ners to understand the challenges the proposed approach faces, and how these could be resolved. We want to know if the approach be top down or bottom up – or both? We want to hear your thoughts, ideas and reflections, both positive and negative. In working collaboratively to establish the IMF we will enable a National Digital Twin that is implementable and usable, in order to enable society to tackle the urgent and cross-silo challenges of achieving carbon reduction targets and effectively coordinate disaster response. We will also be able to derive the greater benefits of securely connecting our data assets. This process will require debate and deliberation along the way and invite many questions to which answers might not be immediate or clear. That is because our vision to create a digital built Britain is not complete or static; it is an evolving development emerging from multiple voices and viewpoints across a wide range of organisations – big and small, public and private, clients and contractors. Our webinar marking the publication of the report attracted a range of questions and this is precisely what is needed to interrogate the approach, to challenge its strengths, identify weaknesses and test resilience. Some people are keen to know if CDBB has started to build a prototype to demonstrate the framework but, as the pathway document explains, we must first build consensus on the prosed approach to an IMF – one cannot happen without the other. Work is underway to create a thin slice of an IMF to start to establish and test a common language and apply this early framework to a platform being developed by the Construction Innovation Hub (CIH) and put it under scrutiny. But first we need to map out the approach that will enable a demonstrable piece of the framework. The top-level academic contribution to the developing framework will also be studied closely to ensure it is robust and resilient, able to withstand change, to grow and expand. Challenge will simultaneously come from the bottom-up when organisations will input to test competency. The IMF is designed to make connections between digital twins and provide operators and decision-makers with resilient and secure verified data sharing to enable a wider view of the implications of decisions and insights that invite timely interventions and potentially better outcomes. The decision-making and the form it takes is the responsibility of organisations and businesses themselves and beyond the scope of this report – but we do want to hear your views. With that in mind we have created two new communities here on the DT Hub – Architects and Developers – dedicated to the discussion around the development of the IMF and the operational implementation of the Framework within organisations. Our Architects Community has been established for those involved in real-world application and implementation of information management. The group will test and calibrate the NDT programme’s approach to the IMF and provide a forum for discussion on challenges, opportunities and the practicalities for implementation. Our Developer Community, comprising information management, data science and integration specialists, is bringing scrutiny to the IMF approach and has been established to provide a rich discussion area for the core concepts, tenets and philosophies of the Framework and its constituent parts. If you have ideas, questions or observations about the Pathway document then please engage with us via these two new communities. Achieving alignment, interoperability, protocols, governance and standards to allow individual businesses to flourish while serving the interests of society needs engagement and contribution from as many of you as possible. It is time to collaborate at scale. I look forward to working together to shape an IMF to secure the sharing of data, enabling insight to drive informed decision-making is an essential process, unlocking value and delivering better outcomes for the greater good.
  9. Predicting the future is something intrinsic to the human condition. Whether we are thinking about lunch, retirement, or developing a world-shaking invention like the iPhone. What if the biggest barrier to realising the potential of innovation is not technology, but belief? Predictions of the future from the 1950s included people flying around in their own helicopters to do their daily chores. Ignoring the acceptability of helicopters powering up and blowing the contents of everyone’s gardens everywhere, this future could have happened. There is no technological boundary to everyone having a helicopter in their garden or on the street. However, it was believed correctly that flying machines are extremely dangerous and that their ownership and piloting should be rigorously controlled. That then, is why that idea never took off. It may be tempting to scoff at this suggestion entirely, but there are now several places only accessible by plane and even a housing estate in Florida where every resident owns a plane as their primary means of transportation. If you would like your own home with an attached hanger, check them out here. The motor vehicle faced very similar push back from the populace and the media when they were introduced. They were smelly, loud and dangerous, not to mention costly. However, once the car had been accepted as an ordinary part of everyday life, the risk increased as they became faster. Cars were now so intrinsically embedded in our society that the idea of removing them had become unconscionable. Digital twins will undergo the same process of becoming publicly acceptable as the question of risk continues to arise. The idea of a building or a motorway self-managing might seem like a stretch to the layperson, but this has already begun with Building Management Systems and Smart Motorways. It is important that we acknowledge the ability of these systems to fail and make sure that we have integrated fail safes that perform the equivalent role of airbags in cars. Similarly, the idea of the smartphone underwent a similar process of becoming acceptable to the general public not so long ago. They were already present in our society when the iPhone was released, but it was the iPhone that made the concept of the smartphone mainstream. Was it that the technology was superior? In part perhaps. What really made the difference was that Apple sold us a lifestyle choice. That narrative around the iPhone, its versatility thanks to the app store and its good looks were what really made the difference. The technology already existed, but it had never been brought together effectively as a whole product. The app store enabled owners to customise their experience and created a platform for services that today is worth billions of dollars. The Digital Twin is to the Internet of Things what the iPhone was to the smartphone. The concept of connecting things to the internet makes sense and smart speakers and smart devices have had some success. However, the concept of the internet of things is nebulous at its core. Its story raises questions, we connect things to the internet. That’s it. It’s up to the developers of technology to take that idea and turn it into real products. You cannot procure an internet of things; you cannot own one. A digital twin however is procurable. It is also neatly definable to the layperson. You have a physical asset and a digital representation of that asset; these twins communicate with each other so that you can manage your assets more effectively. You can see the digital twin, make changes to it and they happen in the physical twin. This simplicity of narrative is exactly what sold the first iPhone. Your email, music, calls and the internet are all in one place. It’s a very simple idea to communicate despite it being a very complex product. If you compare this sales pitch with the O2 XDA, the rival smartphone at the time, you see a focus on technical specifications. The advert did not answer how this product will make your life easier or better, instead it focused on power and speed, which for an enthusiast (such as myself, who owned an O2 XDA) is very enticing, but for the wider population made little or no headway. It is the narrative of the Digital Twin and the National Digital Twin that makes the difference, having prepared the groundwork for public acceptability with the Gemini principles of purpose, trust and function we have learnt the lessons of the past when adopting an innovation so that we do not need to sacrifice the individual’s rights and safety for the general public good as we did for cars. Similarly, with the story of the National Digital Twin we have learnt the lesson of the iPhone, that innovation must be tailored to people’s lifestyles, that is not simply a technology for the sake of it, but something that will enhance our lives in an easily understandable way. We have a challenge then, if the brand is as important as the technology, how do you think Digital Twins should be marketed? What should be the story we tell?
  10. The DT Hub warmly welcomes the endorsement from the ICE ICG White Paper: Covid-19 and the new normal for infrastructure systems – next steps for the National Digital Twin programme. https://www.ice.org.uk/news-and-insight/policy/covid-and-new-normal-for-infrastructure-systems The paper sets out that “It is impossible to expect a transformation of the infrastructure and construction industries to occur without widespread and coherent adoption of digital technologies and data… The rise of digital technologies has led to the concept of the digital twin, a representation of a physical infrastructure asset in a digital format which can aid the modelling and understanding of that asset. The concept of a National Digital Twin – an ecosystem of digital twins connected via securely shared data – and an information management framework, which would enable effective information sharing, is an extension of this idea. The National Digital Twin sets out a structured approach to managing data about infrastructure within the infrastructure system as a whole and promotes the Gemini Principles to ensure this data is used for the public good.” The paper makes the forward thinking recommendation that “Increased funding should be made available for the National Digital Twin Programme and the creation of digital twins should be mandated for all major projects and programmes.” How would such a mandate affect your digital twin journey?
  11. KReevesDigi

    Twin Tools

    Hello Everybody !! First topic on the lovely new Twin Hub and good to see fellow enthusiasts get engaged. I would be interested to know the types of tools people are using within their Digital Twin journeys and for what purpose, this is important as getting vendors included and supporting the IMF will be crucial success at scale. A few tools we are using in Costain to get the discussion moving (non-exhaustive, only scratching the surface!) : ArchiMate - We use this as the starting point aligned to the TOGAF architectural framework. This is really key as it starts with business outcomes / objectives and the required business architecture to support realising those outcomes. This then follows into the sexy technical architectures and associated data models, taking account of identity and access management, backups, archive etc etc Bentley iTwin - A familiar offering from Bentley, we are using iTwin on a couple of projects as a data platform, linking design data to other operational systems, with an inclusion of real time data to come shortly! Microsoft Azure - Perhaps not an obvious choice though very useful for enterprise scale data integration. Very effective for moving data around an organisation and driving insights, the same can be done with AWS, Bluemix or any of the other large platform providers. Modern cloud tools enable quick data integration from existing databases without any code or SQL queries, making this process very streamlined. SCADA - often get overlooked though supervisory control and data acquisition solutions (Rockwell, Iconics, Schneider, Siemens etc) have been delivering real time digital twins (albeit in 2D) for decades. Modern variants allow full ERP integration so that operational information (alarms, events etc) can be linked directly to maintenance tools / schedules for example. Iconics and others have embraced BIM where models and associated info can be imported into SCADA to give amazing O&M capability that is real time by default. We are driven by client demands and typically look to use what they have already, the key to scaled Digital Twin's is really in the data standards (IMF) but also the integration architecture. In the past I have worked on projects where standard visualisation objects, control code (function blocks), data models, design info and O&M info were all aligned to physical standard products. This is the absolute nirvana where the design, build, operate and maintain costs are all significantly reduced, delivering both a standardised physical asset and digital counterpart. What tools do you use and for what purpose? Do you look to create standard libraries or go for the bespoke option? Be really interested to hear from others on this super exciting topic !! Regards KevinReevesDigi
  12. McKinsey have produced an excellent construction technology map. Do you agree with the areas they have encompassed within the remit of digital twins? https://public.tableau.com/views/ConstructionTechnologyEcosystem/ConstructionTechnologyEcosystem?:embed=y&:showVizhome=No&:display_count=n&:origin=viz_share_link
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