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General Ontology


General

  • Ontologically Committed

    Ontological
  • Commitment Level

    Low
  • Subject

    Foundational
  • Categorical

    Yes

Vertical

  • Parent-arity Type Instance

    Unconstrained
  • Boundedness Type Instance - Downward

    Bounded
  • Boundedness Type Instance - Fixed Finite Levels

    Not Fixed
  • Boundedness Type Instance - Number of Fixed Levels

    Not applicable
  • Stratification Type Instance

    Not yet assessed
  • Formal Generation - Whole Part - Fusion

    Not yet assessed
  • Formal Generation - Whole Part - Complement

    Not yet assessed
  • Formal Generation - Type Instance - Fusion

    Not yet assessed
  • Formal Generation - Super Sub Type - Fusion

    Not yet assessed
  • Formal Generation - Super Sub Type - Complement

    Not yet assessed
  • Relation Class-ness Type Instance

    Second-class
  • Relation Class-ness Super Sub Type

    Second-class

Horizontal

  • Spacetime

    Separating
  • Locations

    Separating
  • Properties

    Unifying
  • Endurants

    Unifying
  • Immaterial

    Not yet assessed

Universal

  • Merelogy

    No
  • Interpenetration

    Not yet assessed
  • Materialism

    Not adopted
  • Possibilia

    Possible Worlds
  • Criteria Of Identity

    Not yet assessed
  • Time

    Eternalist
  • Indexicals: Here And Now

    Not yet assessed
  • Higher-arity

    Supported

General Ontology - GO 

  1. Overview 

General Ontology is a proposal to illustrate a top-level ontology over a multiplicity of domain specific ontologies. It builds upon advances in AI and philosophy in the late 90s. 

  1. Top-level 

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  1. Key characteristics 

 General Ontology is a top-level ontology over a multiplicity of domain specific ontologies. 

  1. Relevant extracts 

For any area of a special-purpose ontology, it is possible to make changes like these to move toward greater generality. An obvious question then arises: do all these ontologies converge on a general-purpose ontology? The answer is, "Possibly." In this section, we will present one version, representing a synthesis of ideas from many knowledge representation efforts in AI and philosophy. (p. 227) 

If we say that all instances of the category Food are edible,: and if we assert that Fruit is a subclass of Food and Apples is a subclass of Fruit, then we know '. that every apple is edible. (p. 230) 

Notice that because Tomatoes is a category, and is a member of DomesticatedSpecies, then DomesticatedSpecies must be a category of categories. One can even have categories of categories of categories, but they are not much use. (p. 231) 

Russell, Stuart J and Norvig, Peter, “Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach”, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs (NJ), 1995 


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