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  1. Anglian Water is an early adopter of digital twins within the water sector, working closely with the Centre for Digital Built Britain to help develop the market and showcase how digital twins can support an organisation’s strategic outcomes. Anglian Water has a 15 year vision to develop a digital twin to sit alongside its physical assets. From an Anglian Water perspective, the Digital Twin is essentially an accurate digital representation of their physical assets, enabling insight, supporting decision making and leading to better outcomes. Aligning the digital twin objectives to Anglian Water’s regulated outcomes, as defined by the regulator OFWAT, has been a key step in developing the business case. With the initial vision and roadmap outlined the next step on the roadmap was to implement a proof of concept, to explore the value created from digital twins. Anglian Water undertook a discovery phase and a Proof of Concept with Black and Veatch for a Digital Twin back in 2019, and started to define how a Digital Twin would benefit the delivery and management of physical assets. The discovery phase looked to understand the current landscape, further enhancing the vision and roadmap, and establish persona requirements. It proved vital to really understand the organisation and the impact on people during this early exploratory work. The proof of concept looked at delivering three main outputs, focused on a pumping station to keep the scope focused and value measurable: To demonstrate an asset intelligence capability To demonstrate a visualisation capability To examine the asset data and architecture. Alongside the proof of concept other initiatives were kick started to consider how other elements of digital twin might add value, with a focus on more enhanced use of hydraulic models to explore how water networks could be further optimised. Anglian Water recognised early on that by integrating and enhancing many of the existing enterprise systems, existing investments could be leveraged and technology gaps identified. Learning from the proof of concept and other early works Anglian Water looked to the next step of the roadmap, a scaled demonstrator on the Strategic Pipeline Alliance. The Strategic Pipeline Alliance was set up to deliver up to 500km of large scale pipeline, and alongside this to start defining and delivering the first phase of the digital twin. SPA has a 2025 vision is to deliver a large-scale, holistically linked water transfer resilience system. This will be operated, performance managed and maintained using advanced digital technology. The SPA team set about developing a digital twin strategy which is based on the wider corporate vision and enhances the proof of concept work. The basic premise of the SPA digital twin is to integrate traditionally siloed business functions and systems, to deliver enhanced capability across the asset lifecycle. As with Anglian Water the SPA strategy is focused on using the technology available and developing a robust enterprise, integration, and data architecture to create a foundation for digital twin. Taking this a step further it was decided to adopt a product based approach, thinking about the development of digital twin products aligned to physical assets, that could be re-used across the wider Anglian Water enterprise. This whole life product based approach threw up some interesting challenges, namely how to build a business case that delivered benefit to SPA and also enabled Anglian Water’s future ambitions, taking a lifecycle view of the value delivered. To achieve this meant considering and assessing the value to both SPA during the capital delivery phase and Anglian Water during the operational phases. This process also highlighted that certain elements of the digital twin deliver value to both SPA and Anglian Water equally and could therefore be considered as a shared benefit. The resulting benefits register helped to identify the value delivered to the alliance partners which was vital to securing the delivery board sign off. As Anglian Water are a partner in the alliance, the ability to demonstrate value in the operational phase with SPA developing the technical foundation, was another key element in securing the investment. As part of the overall process the SPA board were keen to see how the investment would be allocated, therefore the strategy evolved to incorporate the capabilities to be developed within SPA to enable digital twin. This helped to inform and validate the team for digital twin delivery. With the capabilities and organisational chart resolved, a governance framework was put into place to allow the digital twin evolution to be managed effectively, putting in place the right checks and balances. This has included input and oversight from the wider Anglian Water team as ultimately, they will be responsible for managing the various digital twins long term. To validate the digital twin against the SPA outcomes and objectives, the various elements of the digital twin were incorporated into the overall enterprise architecture. This has proved to be an important part of the process to ensure alignment to the wider capabilities and importantly ensure the right technology is in place. The enterprise architecture continues to evolve to include information objects below the application layer, again building on the product based approach, so that the enterprise architecture can be utilised in the wider Anglian Water Alliances. In total the development of the strategy, business case and capabilities has taken 6 months, however it is important to note that this builds on the earlier proof of concept and ideation during the initial mobilisation of SPA. Given the approach a key next step is to work with Anglian Water to explore accelerated deployment of SPA digital twins on other major schemes, to put to test the product approach and maximise the investment made. We have learnt from the early developments on SPA that articulating a whole life view of value is vital and that focusing on capital / operational stages is equally important, so that appropriate budget holders can see the value being delivered. We have also learnt the importance of having a bold vision which must be matched by clear definition of the first few steps, showing a long term roadmap for achieving an enterprise digital twin. What is certainly clear is that we still have a lot to learn, however by following good architectural best practice and placing people and our environment at the heart of digital twin, we have put in place a good foundation from which to build. If you would like to know more, please get in touch through the DT Hub.
  2. Visual intelligence is the ability to capture, connect and communicate information about spaces in real time. Then to instantly transform it through visualisation techniques into accurate, accessible, actionable data useable by anyone that needs. A process embedded in the simple digital twin but enabled by emerging technologies, specifically the digital integration between devices, enhanced by immersive technology and artificial intelligence. Think of visual intelligence as a compass. Without it, a vessel can’t make the most of its assets, is uncertain where it’s headed, how it will be impacted by the environment and how it can reach its destination with maximum efficiency and care for its crew. Businesses have to take certain actions to increase ROI, communicate to and manage disparate teams, automate with confidence, set out clear directions and grow faster. Connected and integrated data translated into visual intelligence enables these actions. It is the compass. Attached are some insight from a few companies who started with a simple digital twin – a connection of data – but who have embraced visual intelligence and what it means for them National Digital Twin presentation (1.1).pdf
  3. Interesting Question: What is one difficulty that you’ve encountered while trying to create a Digital Twin? Context: We’ve heard that creating a Digital Twin can be a bumpy road. Various challenges can get in the way no matter what sort of Digital Twin you’re trying to set up or why. We’ve noticed in various conversations on the DT Hub that there is a wide range of these challenges, from technical or cultural to those related to resources or supply chains, and so many more. We’d like to hear about your experiences, so please share them with us here. Just a few guidelines before you start: One example at a time please - no lists! However, multiple posts are welcomed Please cite the industry you’re talking about Please: Your posts need to be pithy: · Give each post a title that sums up your blocker · Limit each post to 100 words or so, or supply a short summary at the top if you can’t. · Please include an image, it helps your post stand out We encourage you to like, or vote, on each other’s posts if you agree with them, your facilitator Joao and the DT Hub/ 100%Open are looking forward to reading your input. Thank you.
  4. Catherine Condie

    Smart Infrastructure Index Survey 2021 now open!

    We are inviting you to complete our 2021 Smart Infrastructure Index© Survey with a special focus on digital twins. Twelve months on from the release of our first version of the Index survey for asset owners and operators, we are broadening our reach so that our digital twin question set is relevant to all DT Hub members. The Smart Infrastructure Index is a user-friendly way for DT Hub members to measure digital maturity and benchmark progress against peers.  Understand your digital maturity using a proven methodology  Identify capability gaps and priorities in your digital roadmap  Benchmark performance against peers and learn from the best  Start your Smart Infrastructure Index Survey here. We will process entries until mid-November 2021. Once you have completed the survey, don’t forget to fill in your name and organisation to receive your personalised report including a score and targeted recommendations. These will be sent straight to your DT Hub email inbox. In the weeks that follow, we will analyse all responses and send everyone a full industry report. Benefits of completing the survey For individuals: Instant, personalised results sent direct to your email inbox; see how your score compares to the sector average and best practice; view your tailored strategic recommendations; identify which archetype you are (optimist, traditionalist etc.) For organisations: Measure your digital maturity; identify what to prioritise; benchmark against the best Why should industry complete the Index? Index insights highlight common challenges, recommendations provide solutions to these challenges; benchmarking helps identify best practice, case studies can be shared; industry-wide capability gaps addressed as a priority Digital twin focus The DT Hub and Mott MacDonald Digital Ventures have worked together to bolster the standard Index of seven categories, with an additional question set for those working on the delivery of a major project or programme, and a question set that revolves around digital twins. The digital twin questions are designed specifically for members of the DT Hub and ask about: Digital twins Customers Commercial Digital transformation Asset management Asset delivery Asset performance Continuous improvement When members complete the survey, the Index will generate a personalised report including a score and targeted recommendations, sent straight to their DT Hub email inbox after completion. Read the 2020 Index Survey Summary and watch the Interview
  5. The Open Geospatial Consortium, an open standards consortium with an experimental innovation arm, invites digital twin enthusiasts to evaluate the use of APIs and web services to connect to a variety of information resources in the built environment. https://www.ogc.org/projects/initiatives/idbepilot At this stage, we are after use cases, ideas, datasets and establish the requirements for a 4 months pilot. Use cases may include Building Condition Assessments across larger portfolios and evaluating building occupancy under certain constraints such as social distancing. Response period ends September 30st, 2021.
  6. until
    About the event Creating the products that will lead the delivery of true net zero will require transformational change in the product engineering, assurance, and production process. Innovative integration across the entire product, service and infrastructure enterprise will be essential to deliver the ambitious levels of performance that customers, society, and the environmental imperative demand. Digitalisation offers an opportunity to unlock transformation of our industrial system and is a core enabler to ensuring that the UK plays a dominant role in the definition of future mobility solutions. Novel information and data management systems will facilitate the ability to integrate the product & service enterprise across the entire value chain - essential if technology is to be exploited effectively. Digitalisation offers the potential to “democratise excellence” across the entire supply base and across our broad national industrial footprint. In this session, led by experts from the Institute of Digital Engineering, we look at one of today’s top technology trends, Digital Twins, and how it’s changing the way businesses operate, the customer experience, and its contribution to cleaner, more efficient, and safer products and services. But what is exactly is a digital twin and how can it add value? Is this the key to sustainability and future economic success, or is it just the new toy on the market? Speakers for this event include: Mark Enzer OBE, Head of National Digital Twin programme (CDBB), Chief Technical Officer at Mott MacDonald Jose Garcia-Urruchi, Head of Digital Engineering Capability - Jaguar Land Rover Peter Van Manen, Principal Consultant - Frazer-Nash Consultancy Louise Krug, Technical Lead – BT Bradley Yorke-Biggs, CEO & Professor of Practice – Institute of Digital Engineering IDE UK Register for this free webinar at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/road-to-cop26-digitalisation-tickets-168562441801
  7. Katie Walsh

    Defining Our Digital Twin Challenges!

    Creating Digital Twins can be like sailing in uncharted waters, so how do you handle it when unforeseen challenges rock the boat? Can you even predict what kinds of things will disrupt your journey? We’ve noticed in various conversations on the DT Hub that no matter what sort of Digital Twin you’re trying to set up or why, there is an incredibly wide range of potential disruptions. From technical to cultural, from resources to supply chains, almost every avenue is susceptible to producing a challenge somewhere. Many examples that we’ve already seen have only become apparent once the people developing Digital Twins are up against them in real time, so that’s why the DT Hub has launched this new activity, Defining Our Digital Twin Challenges! We would like to know about the challenges you’ve encountered on your DT journey in order to make the overall roadmap easier to follow. The information you provide will help us to ultimately define our common challenges so we can start to solve them together. This series of thematic workshops, run by the DT Hub, will progress the conversation around the Digital Twin Journey, and surface some of the challenges that organisations are still facing whilst embarking on their journey. Each Challenge will culminate in an Activity, where we will present the specific challenge areas that you have brought to us to a select group in order to provide constructive feedback. The outcome of these workshops will be to share insights from inside and outside the community for the benefit of the community as a whole. You can use this activity Bring out your Digital Twin Challenges to explore your challenges with others, and our crowd facilitator, Joao, will be interacting with you to make sure you get the best experience possible. Joao is a former market researcher, court interpreter and has been a brilliant member of our team for years as a 100%Open Associate. We look forward to your invaluable contributions, and in turn the exponential development of the DT journey.
  8. The Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC) is organizing a series of events as part of their Road to COP26 programme. The overall aim is to communicate how the UK are delivering the 2050 net-zero automotive roadmap together, showing the automotive industry in the UK as a key collaborator working with other nations and sectors towards climate goals as well as their key technologies and expertise enabling great innovation for this transition. As part of this events programme, The Institute of Digital Engineering - IDE UK (www.ideuk.org) is co-hosting an event on Digital Twins in September. We would very much like to hear from any digital twin initiatives taking place in the automotive industry - particularly as part of the engineering process - to take part in this event as part of the panel discussions. It would be beneficial to demonstrate to the automotive industry the value of digital twins, and what the industry is and should be doing on this front, along with the achieved benefits and the potential consequences of inaction. Despite the number of Digital Twin programmes and initiatives taking place nationally, there seems to be a gap when it comes to case studies from the automotive industry. If you know of, or are involved in, any digital twin initiatives in the automotive sector we would love to hear from you! Please reach out to sunniva.skorve@ideuk.org IDE UK sits within Loughborough University as a spoke of APC and is a government funded institute with the vision to establish the UK as the global leader in digital engineering, driving innovation, investment, and engineering excellence within the automotive sector.
  9. Hi all, Please have a look at this presentation and share you thoughts! https://digital-twins.kumu.io/describing-digital-twins
  10. Since its creation in 2018, the National Digital Twin programme (NDTp) has had three objectives: Enable a National Digital Twin – an ecosystem of connected digital twins to foster better outcomes from our built environment Deliver an Information Management Framework – ensure secure resilient data sharing and effective information management Align a Digital Framework Task Group to [provide coordination and alignment among key players. In 2021 and with the Digital Framework Task Group of senior leaders from industry, academia and government overseeing progress, it is at a point where key projects are being realised and support for its work is gathering momentum. Here is a summary of the latest developments. The Digital Twin Hub community is now in excess of 2,000 members and its remit to create technical foundations and to provide a co-ordinated community in which to share expertise and knowhow on digital twins is being met with enthusiasm and support from a diverse range of participants across the UK and beyond. This year is proving pivotal in terms of active engagement with our members to better understand their digital maturity and needs, especially through surveys, community activities and international summits. And in parallel is the publication of key documents and resources including the Digital Twin Toolkit and upcoming Collaborative Workshop to help companies make their business cases, and the Digital Twin Standards roadmap, a culmination of work by the British Standards Institute (BSI), which enables a framework for information management and sets out our programme for the next few years. Key to these activities is the willingness of members from both academic and industrial fields to share their own knowledge and experiences. The DT Hub is launching a new series titled Digital Twin Journeys to focus on academic research and lessons learned from digital twin projects focused on construction: buildings, infrastructure and industrial, and satellite applications. In parallel, we will engage with industry to run a consultation on our Flex 260 Standards as well as a second Smart Infrastructure Index (SII) Survey which tracks, in the first instance, digital and organisational maturity levels of asset owner and operator members. At the end of August, we also announced the launch of three thematic workshops to address Digital Twin Roadblocks by progressing the conversation and surfacing the challenges faced by organisations while embarking on their digital twin journeys. The aim is for members to discuss experiences and to elicit the main challenges and blockers encountered in their programmes to date. These monthly workshops will commence at the end of September 2021. Our work on the Information Management Framework, to allow the smooth adoption of digital twin technologies, has also gathered pace with the introduction of a methodology to divide the information management space into manageable segments. The 7 circles approach provides the building blocks for informed decision making and will deliver better information management and information sharing on a national scale. The NDTp’s CReDo project will be running a webinar on 2 November 2021 to coincide with COP26 to give insight into our plans to develop a digital twin across water, energy and telecoms to improve resilience across the infrastructure system. CReDo – Climate Resilience Demonstrator – is applying an Information Management Framework approach to share data across water, energy and telecoms service providers, combined with hydrology and climate data from the Met Office, to help plan for and adapt to the cascading effects of increased flooding due to climate change. Registration for the webinar will be opening soon.
  11. Hi Everyone, I am looking for an 6 month-1 year internship on Digital twins, Regards, AJ +97433193766 Whatsapp
  12. Who are we Game engine technology is at the heart of heralding a new age of content creation, immersive storytelling, design driven development, and business process innovation. These tools are now being utilised to work along side your data to create a visual front end digital twin, to allow for a more immersive, controllable and completely customisable digital twin application. Unreal Engine is a game engine created by Epic Games to allow developers to create their own games and immersive 3D worlds. This technology has seen fast adoption across a number of industries including Manufacturing, Automotive, Film and Media, Architecture, Engineering and Construction [AEC]. As the need to collaborate virtually with stakeholders and end-users has increased, and the need to customise unique applications and visualise our 3D models and data becomes more important, it is where the role of game engines in AEC is making a mark. Unreal Engine is a free, open source tool for creators to develop their custom real-time experiences. Unreal Engine and Digital twins Data alone can often be confusing and hard to understand, its not until the data is contextualised that you are able to better understand the data and turn it into information that can benefit the project. This is where the Unreal Engine is here to support the Digital Twin communities, with its unique ability to aggregate data sources, from 3D geometry, BIM metadata, 4D construction data and IoT Hubs. Users are able to have a centralised location to contextualise the data in its native environment and allow users to build custom applications around it. Getting involved in our future roadmap... As we see more and more companies developing large scale digital twin applications, here at Epic Games we want to make sure we are providing everything you need to make your own digital twin applications with Unreal Engine. To allow you to integrate your existing data, geometry and IoT hub information into a visual platform for sharing with the world. We'd love to hear from you about how you see the world of digital twins evolving. Going forward, which tools and features will you find most valuable in creating digital twins? What kinds of training and support would you like to have access to from Epic Games on this? To help them serve you better, please take their survey about the current state of digital twins, and share your ideas or what you would like to see happen. Take the survey here Results of this survey will be shared to the community for wider awareness. In the mean time you can check out a recent article we shared with one of our customers in China:
  13. I came across an EU funded project "xr4all" which provides a development environment(among other things) for XR projects. The details are here: https://dev.xr4all.eu Will it be possible for the NDT programme to provide similar platform for DT community in the UK? It will help in fostering rapid collaboration and development of the DT ecosystem. Thanks and kind regards, Ajeeth
  14. until
    Delivering the UK National Digital Twin programme - progress and what next? by @Simon Evans, Digital Energy Leader, Arup and Chair of the Gemini Call, National Digital Twin Programme. Book tickets here: Achieving Asset Availability: Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability | Live Online | SEM7336 (imeche.org)
  15. until
    Speaker: Mark Enzer, CDBB and CTO, Mott MacDonald The National Digital Twin (NDT) is a huge idea using “data for the public good” at its heart. The NDT promises enormous value for the people of the UK, both in the delivery of new assets and in the performance of our existing infrastructure. The fundamental premise behind the NDT is: Better data + Better Analysis => Better Decisions => Better outcomes for people and society – which is the essential promise of the Information Age. The NDT is not envisaged as one massive model of everything, but as an ecosystem of connected digital twins. Connecting digital twins requires interoperability to enable secure resilient data to be shared across organisational and sector boundaries. However, interoperability requires a level of data quality and consistency that “the market” cannot achieve on its own; it requires government-level leadership to create the right conditions for “the market” to adopt and deliver to the standards required and in doing so develop and thrive. This presentation will: introduce the National Digital Twin, explain what it is and why we need it, and outline what is being done to deliver it. Register at the link below for Mark's presentation and others: Webinar: DMSG & DAMA collaboration event: Making data good for society | BCS
  16. Today we are delighted to publish the Approach to Develop the Foundation Data Model for the Information Management Framework. This document follows up on the November publication of the Survey of Top-level Ontologies (TLO) and the Survey of Industry Data Models (IDM) and Reference Data Libraries (RDL). (You can find these publications under Gemini Commons/IMF technical Documents.) The pragmatic and technical requirements for the Foundation Data Model have now been developed and consideration has been given as to whether any existing Top-Level Ontologies could be used as a suitable start-point. The Approach takes you through these requirements, the assessment of the surveyed TLOs to the final decision. There are four Top-Level Ontologies that meet all the technical requirements: BORO, IDEAS, HQDM and ISO 15926-2. They are distinct from the other Top-Level Ontologies in being 4-dimensionalist. These allow us to see individual objects as four-dimensional, having both spatial and temporal parts. You can find the Approach to Develop the FDM for the IMF here
  17. In November 2020 the National Digital Twin programme programme published the Survey of Top-level Ontologies (TLO) and the Survey of Industry Data Models (IDM) and Reference Data Libraries (RDL). You can find these publications under Gemini Commons/IMF technical Documents. The technical part of the proposed pathway to an Information Management Framework comprises of three main elements: A Foundation Data Model A Reference Data Library, and An Integration Architecture which define a common structure and meaning for the consistent and integrated sharing of information. The pragmatic and technical requirements for the Foundation Data Model have now been developed and consideration has been given as to whether any existing Top-Level Ontologies could be used as a suitable start-point. There are four Top-Level Ontologies that meet all the technical requirements: BORO, IDEAS, HQDM and ISO 15926-2. They are distinct from the other Top-Level Ontologies in being 4-dimensionalist. These allow us to see individual objects as four-dimensional, having both spatial and temporal parts. We are therefore proceeding to develop the Foundation Data Model seed from these 4-dimensionalist Top-Level Ontologies. The Approach to Develop the Foundation Data Model for the Information Management Framework has been published here alongside the Surveys in the Gemini Commons/ IMF Technical documents. If you would like to ask any questions about the publication, the methods taken and choices made, head over to the IMF Community Network where the programme team are available to respond.
  18. (8) Data wrangling - importing 300+ datasets a quarter - YouTube Is this making the case for bread and butter digital transformation?
  19. Miranda Sharp

    people in the ontology

    Hello all I took a question after the Gemini call this morning. Apologies for my naivety in not knowing the answer myself, but where are people in the TLO? Miranda
  20. olivierthereaux

    Towards a Web of Digital Twins - Article

    Following the successful webinar / online discussion last month, I have now posted an article version of "Towards a Web of Digital Twins". The document summarises the research conducted by the team at the ODI (Open Data Institute) on what it means to connect digital twins and how the concept can scale to a "web" of twins across domains, sectors, and geography. The synthesis of our research is also available as an annotated deck, released under an open licence.
  21. The National Digital Twin Programme has initiated work to create a thin slice of the IMF for the Construction Innovation Hub, to support the development of CIH’s Platform Ecosystem. This thin slice of the IMF is called the FDM Seed. Fig 1.General classification of the TLO – taken from A Survey of Top-level Ontologies The first steps of the FDM Seed project is to survey the landscape, to investigate what ontologies and Data models are already in use out there; what they can do, their limitations, and assess what tools may be useful as a starting point for the FDM and the RDL. The NDTp Commons Technical team have undertaken the landscape survey and have now published two reports: • A survey of Top-level Ontologies (TLOs) • A Survey of Industry Data Models (IDMs) and Reference Data Libraries (RDLs) The final survey of top-level ontologies is, we think, the first of its kind. To take part in the discussion on the surveys and their implications, we invite you to become a member of the Digital Twin Hub and join the Digital Twin Hub IMF Community Network What next? The Programme is now in the process of gathering recommendations for which TLOs to use to start the work on the FDM Seed thin slice. We anticipate basing the FDM development on one of the TLOs, bringing in elements from others, based on the survey & analysis.
  22. Enterprises creating digital twins have a need to understand the benefits their digital twins bring to their own operation but also the benefits which accrue to their customers, supply chain, local community, industry network and relevant government bodies.  An understanding and harnessing of these benefits has the potential to drive not only individual business cases but also impact regional development spend, regulatory price controls and national policy.  In response to this need, CDBB commissioned a piece of work to create a logic model to find a consistent way to describe the benefits of connecting digital twins.  That model has the potential to deliver both the forward view to guide investment decisions in connecting digital twins and also a retrospective assessment of the benefits achieved by connecting them. Read the CDBB blog, What is the point of a National Digital Twin?  to find out more about the logic model The NIC’s Data for the Public Good report and other publications have described benefits to the economy and enterprises from the sharing of data in a secure and resilient way.  As such, the National Digital Twin programme was set up to create the Information Management Framework to enable that secure resilient data sharing in the built environment and beyond.    The vision for the National Digital Twin is not a central repository of all data rather it is a ] principles principles based means to connect data or individual twins to create both public good and value.   The challenge is to understand where the greatest value can be created from the connection of individual twins.   The NDTp will be running a webinar on 20th October where we will discuss the challenges of valuing data assets, the good they deliver, and how connected digital twins may change the way we do business.   To receive the link to the webinar, register via Eventbrite; https://ndtbenefits.eventbrite.co.uk The Webinar will be held, 11:00 – 12:00, Tuesday 20th October, via Zoom Webinar Hosting and chairing the webinar will be the National Digital Twin programme’s Commons Stream Lead, Miranda Sharp. Joining Miranda will be a panel of experts; Leigh Dodds – ODI ; Leigh is Director of Delivery at the Open Data Institute. You can read about the ODI’s work on data institutions here: https://theodi.org/article/designing-sustainable-data-institutions-paper/   Herman Heyns – ANMUT Herman is CEO at Anmut and Member of Tech UKs Digital Twins Working Group. Anmut is a consultancy that enables organisations to manage data like any other asset. You can read more about how ANMUT value data on their website: https://anmut.co.uk/data-valuation-what-is-your-data-worth/ and https://anmut.co.uk/why-you-should-be-treating-your-data-as-an-asset/ Peter Vale – Thames Tideway; Peter has worked with a consortium at Tideway which has researched the benefits of digital transformation. We hope to see you there.
  23. Strategic planning for life after Covid-19 brings an unprecedented opportunity to change the way we view and manage our infrastructure. Mark Enzer, from CDBB makes the case for putting people first. The current pandemic has been a powerful but unforgiving teacher. It has demonstrated the importance of data and the power of digital models to derive insights from those data, to help us model outcomes, to guide the pulling of the levers to control “R” and to help us make better more-informed decisions. Covid’s disruptive impact across all sectors and societies has also revealed the interconnections and interdependencies between our economic and social infrastructure, highlighting the importance of creating resilient, sustainable and secure infrastructure systems upon which essential services depend. So why change our view of infrastructure? We have created an amazing, complex machine on which we wholly depend. Without it, our lives would be immeasurably worse. Society would not survive. That machine is infrastructure – our built environment. However, we don’t appreciate the relationship between infrastructure and our wellbeing. Therefore, we don’t set objectives in terms of outcomes for people and society. And although we understand each part of the built environment, we do not manage it as a whole. Therefore, we don’t know how to address its systemic vulnerabilities or make it work better. If we envision, plan and manage infrastructure differently, we can make it what it should truly be: A platform for human flourishing. Putting people first The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) and the Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction (CSIC) have recently published ‘Flourishing systems’, which makes the case for a people-focused systems-based vision for infrastructure. As we consider priorities following the Covid-19 outbreak, we have an opportunity to plot a new course that recognises the fundamental role of infrastructure in the social, economic and environmental outcomes that determine the quality of people’s lives. To do this, we must see infrastructure as a complex, interconnected system of systems that must deliver continuous service to society. Infrastructure is so much more than just a series of construction projects. Adopting a system-of-systems approach makes it possible to address the great systemic challenges such as achieving net-zero carbon emissions, improving resilience and preparing for a circular economy. It also unlocks the potential of digital transformation across the built environment. How digitalisation delivers value With the ongoing digital transformation of the infrastructure industry, we have the opportunity to deliver huge benefit for people – for whom infrastructure ultimately exists. Digital transformation encompasses how we function as organisations, how we deliver new assets and how we operate, maintain and use existing assets. Bringing digital and physical assets together creates cyber-physical systems – smart infrastructure. Effectively, this is applying the fourth industrial revolution to infrastructure. Making better use of asset and systems data is central to this vision because better analysis of better data enables better decisions, producing better outcomes, which is the essential promise of the information age. As part of this, we must recognise digital assets, such as data, information, algorithms and digital twins, as genuine ‘assets’, which have value and must be managed effectively and securely. In time, as data and digital assets become valued, data itself will be seen as infrastructure. We are now at a point where the vision for effective digitalisation of the whole of the built environment is within reach. Enabling secure, resilient data sharing Managing complex interconnected systems requires the appropriate tools. CDBB’s National Digital Twin programme sets out a structured approach for effective information management across the system as a whole. This approach is informed by ‘The Gemini Principles’ and is driven by the NIC’s ‘data for the public good’ report. The recent paper ‘Pathway Towards an Information Management Framework’ suggests an approach for the development of an Information Management Framework to enable secure, resilient data sharing across the built environment. It is this that will enable data connections between digital twins, which is at the heart of the concept of the ‘National Digital Twin’ – an ecosystem of connected digital twins. All systems go Taking a systems-based approach to our infrastructure will improve our ability to deliver desirable outcomes for people and society – around accessibility, inclusion, empowerment, resilience and wellbeing – not just for now but for generations to come. It will also better equip us to address the urgent global systemic challenge of climate change. It’s time to see infrastructure differently – as a system of systems that provides a platform for human flourishing. flourishing-systems_final_digital.pdf
  24. The National Digital Twin programme is a national programme, built on consensus. As the open consultation on our proposed approach to an IMF draws to a close, Miranda Sharp IMF Engagement Lead at CDBB shares how the DT Hub members can continue to shape its development. We believe the IMF is the key to enabling secure, resilient data sharing between organisations and sectors in the built environment and want to work with you to devel0p it. Greater use of digital technologies and information in the built environment increases capacity, efficiency, reliability and resilience. This in turn enables existing assets to enhance service provision for people, as well as improving efficiency in design and delivery of new assets through a better understanding of whole-life performance of those assets already in place. We know that by working collaboratively with members of the DT Hub, who share in that vision, we will end up with a better end result. My role within the programme is to help make your voice heard, and to open conversations where you can ask the challenging questions we need to find answers to. During the next phase of the consultation we will be running in-depth interviews with practiti0ners to understand the challenges the proposed approach faces, and how these could be resolved. We want to know if the approach be top down or bottom up – or both? We want to hear your thoughts, ideas and reflections, both positive and negative. In working collaboratively to establish the IMF we will enable a National Digital Twin that is implementable and usable, in order to enable society to tackle the urgent and cross-silo challenges of achieving carbon reduction targets and effectively coordinate disaster response. We will also be able to derive the greater benefits of securely connecting our data assets. This process will require debate and deliberation along the way and invite many questions to which answers might not be immediate or clear. That is because our vision to create a digital built Britain is not complete or static; it is an evolving development emerging from multiple voices and viewpoints across a wide range of organisations – big and small, public and private, clients and contractors. Our webinar marking the publication of the report attracted a range of questions and this is precisely what is needed to interrogate the approach, to challenge its strengths, identify weaknesses and test resilience. Some people are keen to know if CDBB has started to build a prototype to demonstrate the framework but, as the pathway document explains, we must first build consensus on the prosed approach to an IMF – one cannot happen without the other. Work is underway to create a thin slice of an IMF to start to establish and test a common language and apply this early framework to a platform being developed by the Construction Innovation Hub (CIH) and put it under scrutiny. But first we need to map out the approach that will enable a demonstrable piece of the framework. The top-level academic contribution to the developing framework will also be studied closely to ensure it is robust and resilient, able to withstand change, to grow and expand. Challenge will simultaneously come from the bottom-up when organisations will input to test competency. The IMF is designed to make connections between digital twins and provide operators and decision-makers with resilient and secure verified data sharing to enable a wider view of the implications of decisions and insights that invite timely interventions and potentially better outcomes. The decision-making and the form it takes is the responsibility of organisations and businesses themselves and beyond the scope of this report – but we do want to hear your views. With that in mind we have created two new communities here on the DT Hub – Architects and Developers – dedicated to the discussion around the development of the IMF and the operational implementation of the Framework within organisations. Our Architects Community has been established for those involved in real-world application and implementation of information management. The group will test and calibrate the NDT programme’s approach to the IMF and provide a forum for discussion on challenges, opportunities and the practicalities for implementation. Our Developer Community, comprising information management, data science and integration specialists, is bringing scrutiny to the IMF approach and has been established to provide a rich discussion area for the core concepts, tenets and philosophies of the Framework and its constituent parts. If you have ideas, questions or observations about the Pathway document then please engage with us via these two new communities. Achieving alignment, interoperability, protocols, governance and standards to allow individual businesses to flourish while serving the interests of society needs engagement and contribution from as many of you as possible. It is time to collaborate at scale. I look forward to working together to shape an IMF to secure the sharing of data, enabling insight to drive informed decision-making is an essential process, unlocking value and delivering better outcomes for the greater good.
  25. The Pathway towards an Information Management Framework (IMF) was published by CDBB at the end of May and contains the collaborative vision of over 70 contributors that came together to build a consensus on how we can build a national digital twin from a nation of digital twins. In response to the National Infrastructure Commission’s report, ‘Data for the Public Good’, the Pathway towards an IMF lays out the ambitious goal of creating a framework where organisations can share data in a robust, resilient and secure way. This will enable better decisions, strengthen the economy and allow for human flourishing. The IMF pathway has at its core, the Gemini Principles, the guiding principles ensuring the framework has purpose, creates trust and is adaptable and flexible enough to work for organisations now and in the future. Taking the selfish approach…. for the greater good The IMF Pathway details the approach to establishing a common language allowing digital twins to talk to each other. This can start within organisations linking up disparate digital twins and breaking up silos to give better corporate control and aid decision making. This then allows the national digital twin to connect those joined up corporate twins by sharing key data to and from other related organisations and sectors to enable deeper insight and benefit to the organisations and the nation for the greater good. In engaging with the IMF Pathway, an organisation has the primary benefit of first recognising the value of their corporate wide data, and secondly, fully preparing themselves to take advantage of, and contribute to, the value and benefit of nationally shared data. The Pathway proposes three building blocks to form the framework:    A Foundation Data Model (FDM): A consistent, clear ontology for the digital twin ecosystem: a structure for sharing and validating data    A Reference Data Library (RDL): Common references, or vocabulary that enable the secure sharing of high-quality data: the common language for describing digital twins    An Integration Architecture (IA): Design and build of the digital systems that manage the connected digital twins: the glue that can link twins together.  The IMF will bring together the standards and data exchange protocols that will allow this ecosystem to create a National Digital Twin from a nation of digital twins. Security and protection of personal data is essential to connecting twins in the right way and is integral in the development of the IMF pathway, as illustrated by this diagram from the IMF Pathway and the accompanying Approach Summary. Following the release of the IMF Pathway, CDBB hosted a webinar and was delighted by the response of the participants and the enthusiasm for the IMF. The recording of the webinar is available on the DT Hub to watch at any time. Continuation of collaboration and consultation The Pathway continues to be a collaborative process and we now look to you to help ensure the widest possible feedback on the document to make sure it meets the needs of infrastructure asset owners, local authorities, architects, engineering consultants, construction companies, software developers, AI companies, big tech and more. The consultation is open until the end of August and we would really value your input.
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