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  1. PRESS RELEASE With the announcement that the Digital Twin Hub will transition to an Industry/Catapult partnership housed at the Connected Places Catapult (CPC), we are pleased to add that the next phase of the National Digital Twin programme’s Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) will also move to CPC. This next phase will build on the excellent efforts of the interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral team who worked on CReDo so far. This work is being shared openly to contribute to a culture of secure data sharing for the purposes of resilience and adaptation to climate change. The first phase of CReDo, showing the benefits of connected digital twins across infrastructure networks on adaptation and resilience, is coming to a close at the end of March. This phase of the project, funded by UK Research and Innovation, the University of Cambridge and CPC, wrapped up with a public webinar on 2nd March 2022, which was attended by over 240 participants and featured insights from the technical development team, funders and asset owners. So far, CReDo has demonstrated how collaboration through connected digital twins is key to tackling climate change. The project is marking the move into its next phase at CPC with a series of outputs that will share key findings, benefits, lessons learned and the technical approach to this first-of-its-kind collaboration. These are all openly available on the Digital Twin Hub from today. Discussing the urgency for collaboration through connected digital twins, Sarah Hayes, Head of the CReDo project, said: “The risks arising from failing to adapt to climate change are huge. CReDo seeks to mitigate these risks by increasing our understanding of infrastructure interdependencies and the future impact of interventions to increase resilience. The CReDo team have worked incredibly hard to lay the foundations for increasing infrastructure system resilience. It is the skills of our people, supported by new technologies, which will take forward our capability to tackle climate change through connected digital twins.” Pointing to the potential for this work to have a positive impact, Mark Enzer, Head of the National Digital Twin programme, said: “In a wonderfully tangible and relevant way, CReDo has shown the value of enabling secure information flow across sector boundaries. But this should be just the beginning. The idea of connecting digital twins must be extended to other sectors and other use cases – not only in addressing climate change, but wherever we need to understand systems better and intervene more effectively. I believe in CReDo!” Looking forward to the next phase of the project, Yalena Coleman, Director of Applied Data & Technology at CPC, said, “Integrated infrastructure is a key strategic focus area for Connected Places Catapult, and we will be investing in further phases of CReDo, working together with partners to take forward the key learnings from this phase. We will ensure the learnings are shared with the wider community and across other relevant initiatives like the Digital Connectivity Infrastructure Accelerator, National Underground Asset Register and others; and link up industry, academia and government thinking in this area.”
  2. This month, the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) will celebrate completing its part of the mission to advance the digital transformation of the built environment, therefore we are developing materials to celebrate all of the foundational work that has been done. As part of our legacy, we have published the Gemini Papers – a series of papers that outline what we have learnt is necessary for the success of national-level connected digital twin programmes. We hosted a webinar on Thursday, 10 March to mark the launch and present the papers. Here is a link to the webinar recording in case you missed it. The Gemini Papers consolidate our shared learnings from the past five years, showcasing the vital role connected digital twins can play in improving social, economic, and environmental outcomes to create a better quality of life for us all. We are delighted to publish what we have learnt and to present the ‘what’, ‘why’ and ‘how’ of connected digital twins. Our CDBB journey and mission could not have been possible without the support of key organisations and industry leaders. With that in mind, we are reaching out to people who have been involved with us in championing digital transformation to seek support for the Gemini Papers – click here to download your copy. We would be very grateful if you would consider providing a statement of support for the Gemini Papers that we could display on the DT Hub and the CDBB website along with your company logo. The supporting statements and logos will form part of our promotional activity to communicate the Gemini Papers and the statements will also be used in social media posts. If you would like to take part, please could you send the following information to our Engagement team - engagement@cdbb.cam.ac.uk Supporting quote / statement (30-50 words): Name (as you would like it displayed) Job title Organisation Please provide high resolution logos in JPEG We would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your support.
  3. Osama Zaki

    Connected Digital Things

    Several Terms such as Digital Ecosystem, Digital Life, Digital World, Digital Earth have been used to describe the growth in technology. Digital twins are contributing to this progress, and it will play a major role in the coming decades. More digital creatures will be added to our environments to ease our life and to reduce harms and dangerous. But can we trust those things? Please join the Gemini call on the 29th of March; Reliability ontology was developed to model hardware faults, software errors, autonomy/operation mistakes, and inaccuracy in control. These different types of problems are mapped into different failure modes. The purpose of the reliability ontology is to predict, detect, and diagnose problems, then make recommendations or give some explanations to the human-in-the-loop. I will discuss about these topics and will describe how ontology and digital twins are used as a tool to increase the trust in robots. Trust in the reliability and resilience of autonomous systems is paramount to their continued growth, as well as their safe and effective utilisation. A recent global review into aviation regulation for BVLOS (Beyond Visual Line of Sight) with UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) by the United States Congressional Research Office, highlighted that run-time safety and reliability is a key obstacle in BVLOS missions in all of the twelve European Union countries reviewed . A more recent study also highlighted that within a survey of 1500 commercial UAV operators better solutions towards reliability and certification remain a priority within unmanned aerial systems. Within the aviation and automotive markets there has been significant investment in diagnostics and prognostics for intelligent health management to support improvements in safety and enabling capability for autonomous functions e.g. autopilots, engine health management etc. The safety record in aviation has significantly improved over the last two decades thanks to advancements in the health management of these critical systems. In comparison, although the automotive sector has decades of data from design, road testing and commercial usage of their products they still have not addressed significant safety concerns after an investment of over $100 Billion in autonomous vehicle research. Autonomous robotics face similar, and also distinct, challenges to these sectors. For example, there is a significant market for deploying robots into harsh and dynamic environments e.g. subsea, nuclear, space etc which present significant risks along with the added complexity of more typical commercial and operational constraints in terms of cost, power, communication etc which also apply. In comparison, traditional commercial electronic products in the EEA (European Economic Area) have a CE marking, Conformité Européenne, a certification mark that indicates conformity with health, safety, and environmental protection standards for products sold within the EEA. At present, there is no similar means of certification for autonomous systems. Due to this need, standards are being created to support the future requirements of verification and validation of robotic systems. For example, the BSI standards committee on Robots and Robotic Devices and IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems (including P7009 standard) are being developed to support safety and trust in robotic systems. However, autonomous systems require a new form of certification due to their independent operation in dynamic environments. This is vital to ensure successful and safe interactions with people, infrastructure and other systems. In a perfect world, industrial robotics would be all-knowing. With sensors, communication systems and computing power the robot could predict every hazard and avoid all risks. However, until a wholly omniscient autonomous platform is a reality, there will be one burning question for autonomous system developers, regulators and the public - How safe is safe enough? Certification infers that a product or system complies with legal relevant regulations which might slightly differ in nature from technical or scientific testing. The former would involve external review, typically carried out by some regulators to provide guidance on the proving of compliance, while the latter usually refers to the reliability of the system. Once a system is certified, it does not guarantee it is safe – it just guarantees that, legally, it can be considered “safe enough” and that the risk is considered acceptable. There are many standards that might be deemed relevant by regulators for robotics systems. From general safety standards, such as ISO 61508, through domain specific standards such as ISO 10218 (industrial robots), ISO 15066 (collaborative robots), or RTCA DO-178B/C (aerospace), and even ethical aspects (BS8611). However, none of those standards address autonomy, particularly full autonomy wherein systems take crucial, often safety critical, decisions on their own. Therefore, based on the aforementioned challenges and state of the art, there is a clear need for advanced data analysis methods and a system level approach that enables self-certification for systems that are autonomous, semi or fully, and encompasses their advanced software and hardware components, and interactions with the surrounding environment. In the context of certification, there is a technical and regulator need to be able to verify the run-time safety and certification of autonomous systems. To achieve this in dynamic real-time operations we propose an approach utilising a novel modelling paradigm to support run-time diagnosis and prognosis of autonomous systems based on a powerful representational formalism that is extendible to include more semantics to model different components, infrastructure and environmental parameters. To evaluate the performance of this approach and the new modelling paradigm we integrated our system with the Robotics Operating System (ROS) running on Husky (a robot platform from Clearpath) and other ROS components such as SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) and ROSPlan-PDDL (ROS Planning Domain Definition Language). The system was then demonstrated within an industry informed confined space mission for an offshore substation. In addition, a digital twin was utilized to communicate with the system and to analysis the system’s outcome.
  4. Over the past few weeks you may have seen that Hub Insights interviews are back in a "New Horizons" series. Full information is in this article: If you missed the live interviews, you can now watch them in the media section here: Sam Chorlton interviews Ali Nicholl Tom Hughes interviews Melissa Zanocco Tom Hughes interviews Mark Enzer We would love to know what you thought or if the interviews sparked any ideas or questions. Please comment below with your insights and let's keep the conversation going!
  5. Catherine Condie

    NDTp March 2022 Editorial – New horizons

    NDTp March 2022 Editorial – New horizons Interview with Tom Hughes and Peter El Hajj As the DT Hub begins its transition to the Connected Places Catapult (CPC), @Tom HughesDT Hub Lead, and @Peter El HajjNDTp Programme Lead, provide an update on all the latest activities and discuss what’s next for the DT Hub. They also reflect on the programme’s achievements over the past three years and their personal highlights. What can we be looking out for in the next few weeks? Tom: On the DT Hub side, we are focusing on the completion of our Annual Benchmark report which is a retrospective look at the past 12 months and what we have achieved, as well as setting the stage for what’s next. Simon Evans, Digital Energy Lead at Arup, led a community workshop to ensure that we have input from our members and it’s always invaluable to have that community contribution. The other big area of focus is the publication of the Digital Twin Roadblocks report. It brings together our findings from a series of workshops on digital twin blockers and provides ideas on how to address them. We’ve also got a series of Hub Insight interviews, with Ali Nichols – one of the Co-Chairs of the DT Hub Community Council – kicking us off, and finishing with Mark Enzer, Director of CDBB. So, plenty still happening! Peter: I also want to highlight some key documents coming out as part of the Information Management Framework: Managing Shared Data, Towards Information Management Maturity, Thin-Slice Approach and Information Quality Basics. We’re had a great presentation by Ian Bailey on the Integration Architecture at a recent Gemini call. And one last thing to look out for will be our Theory of Change’ and ‘Benefits Realisation Framework’ reports – both are really important for the programme. Who will be hosting the DT Hub going forward? Peter: Some really great news on that front is that the DT Hub will transition from its current home at the CDBB to an Industry/Catapult partnership housed at the Connected Places Catapult (CPC). CPC and the wider Catapult Network have been involved from the early days on the programme and shaped a lot of our thinking and been big supporters throughout. Tom: It’s fantastic that CPC have taken on the role of host to the DT Hub. It’s so valuable to have the voice of industry which we have had through the process. Alongside Connected Places there is also the wider network of catapults: Energy Systems Catapult, Advanced Manufacturing Catapult, and the Digital Catapult – I probably couldn’t think of a better host and group of stakeholders for the Hub to flourish. What do you think have been the biggest achievements of the NDTp? Peter: I think one of them is definitely creating this momentum that is focused on outcomes rather than building a new technology. I think shifting the focus from making it a technical issue to making it a socio-technical programme that requires collaboration - that is a key achievement. I also think it’s been the identification of the requirements at a national level to enable effective information management and an ecosystem of connected digital twins. So, answering the question: ‘what are the components to that?’ We didn’t know this three years ago, but now we have a much more comprehensive idea. Tom: Yes, then the DT Hub was a line item on the roadmap for the National Digital Twin and the opportunity to work with six founding member organisations. We have seen it develop and grow to become a community that is connecting regularly with thousands of organisations. It’s been really exciting to be a part of. It is knowing the knowledge sharing that takes place and watching people support each other that are the real milestones for the community platform. We’re taking more of an enabling role as people share posts and add to discussions that are important to them. That’s a huge thing. Peter: I also think it’s that the DT Hub has become the place where national and international initiatives can come to connect, and those outputs shared. And I am aware of other countries setting up digital centres following the DT Hub model – it’s great that we offer a blueprint for others to use. What has been a personal highlight? Peter: I received an award on behalf of CDBB at the Royal Society and later found out it was the same award that Tim Berners-Lee had received! Although it wasn’t personal as such – I was collecting it for CDBB, it still felt like a special moment. Tom: There are a few! One of them was when we did held our open day and I think being able to step back and present all the projects we had worked on really brought home all that we had achieved. Peter: It was also at that open day that the member numbers of the DT Hub went over 3,000 which felt really significant. Tom: Another highlight was our Christmas get together in 2019. It was so nice to meet with such a fantastic group of clever, passionate people. And it was the same whenever we got together, whether with the Hub team, or a steering group, or the digital framework task group, every time it was such an enjoyable event. Peter: Absolutely, working with such a great bunch of people has been a highlight and as we look forward to our next phase we want to thank everyone for all their hard work. Tom: And likewise, a huge thank you from me.
  6. PRESS RELEASE We are pleased to announce that from 1 April 2022, the DT Hub will transition from its current home at the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) to an Industry/Catapult partnership housed at the Connected Places Catapult (CPC). The DT Hub motto, ‘Learn by doing and progress by sharing’ and its work ethic also complements the CPC mission, to ‘Connect people, places and businesses to a future of sustainable growth and prosperity’. CDBB will have completed its mission on the National Digital Twin programme, creating the world-leading platform and community that is the DT Hub, ensuring it is ready for this new chapter of innovation and knowledge exchange. The transition of the DT Hub to the Industry/Catapult partnership housed at CPC will allow the community to accelerate its growth and address new and exciting project areas across the public and private sectors. It will be an opportunity to reach different people and industry sectors, scale innovation, expand resources and increase knowledge exchange. The DT Hub was launched by CDBB in March 2020 as part of the National Digital Twin programme. In two years, DT Hub membership numbers have grown from an initial group of six to over 3,500 individuals, representing more than 1,600 organisations from over 77 countries. A meeting point for people wherever they are on their digital twin journey, the DT Hub is the ‘go-to’ place for those wanting to find out more about connected digital twins. It has shown the need and desire for a digital twin community, and that collaboration, connection, and knowledge exchange are vital if we are to achieve connected digital twins across the built and natural environments. The next phase of the DT Hub will draw on the strength of the wider Catapult Network and its links to a broad range of innovators across industry and academia to build on the foundations laid by CDDB, growing the Hub’s scale and impact. Commenting on the transition, Alexandra Bolton, Executive Director, CDBB said, “We are thrilled that the DT Hub will continue its mission at the forefront of innovation. We celebrate its achievements and look ahead to an era that will extend cooperation, coordination and collaboration across sectors and inspire even greater progress towards our vision of enabling people and the planet to flourish together for generations.” Paul Wilson, Chief Business Officer, CPC said, “Connected Places Catapult has been working with the Centre for Digital Built Britain since its inception and has been an enthusiastic member of the DT Hub since 2020, taking a leading role in the Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) collaboration, shown at COP 26. We are delighted to be inheriting the work of the Hub and look forward to growing the work of this vibrant and passionate community.” Ends About CDBB   CDBB (Centre for Digital Built Britain) is a partnership between the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the University of Cambridge. It is also a partner in the Construction Innovation Hub. CDBB seeks to understand how the construction and infrastructure sectors could use a digital approach to better design, build, operate, integrate the built environment. A digital built Britain will:  · understand what information is needed to enable better through life economic, social and environmental value from our built environment   · champion human-centric design of infrastructure and the services they deliver   · exploit new and emerging digital construction and manufacturing skills and technology to reduce costs and increase productivity   · grow a new career, business and export opportunities for the UK. www.cdbb.cam.ac.uk   About the National Digital Twin Programme The National Digital Twin programme (NDTp), hosted by the University of Cambridge, is playing a key role in the digital transformation of the UK’s infrastructure, and built environment. Launched by HM Treasury in July 2018, the NDTp has a mandate from Government to facilitate the development of a National Digital Twin – an ecosystem of connected digital twins - to foster better outcomes from our built environment. This is enabled by the Information Management Framework (IMF) and a socio-technical change programme which together provide the necessary building blocks for connected digital twins to share high-quality data securely and effectively. The NDTp is uniting the collective knowledge of diverse voices of experts to support and empower others to advance change and embrace connected digital twins within their organisations. www.digitaltwinhub.co.uk/about/national-digital-twin-programme/ About the Digital Twin Hub The Digital Twin (DT) Hub has been created by The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) as part of the UK Government-mandated National Digital Twin programme (NDTp). Driven by the motto of ‘Learn by doing and progress through sharing’, the DT Hub is a space for digital twin owners and suppliers, as well as information management experts, to come together and collaboratively enable this world-leading vision for the NDTp. The DT Hub connects experts and innovators, providing the opportunity to help shape the future of the built environment in the UK. It is a space to share insight and experience, also to gain further knowledge and seek guidance, on elements such as the Gemini Principles and the Information Management Framework. www.digitaltwinhub.co.uk About the Connected Places Catapult Connected Places Catapult is the UK’s innovation accelerator for cities, transport, and places. We provide impartial ‘innovation as a service’ for public bodies, businesses, and infrastructure providers to catalyse step-change improvements in the way people live, work and travel. We connect businesses and public sector leaders to cutting-edge research to spark innovation and grow new markets. We run technology demonstrators and SME accelerators to scale new solutions that drive growth, spread prosperity, and eliminate carbon. www.cp.catapult.org.uk Connected Places Catapult is part of the wider Catapult Network www.catapult.org.uk
  7. Version 1.0.0

    217 downloads

    CReDo aims to demonstrate how the National Digital Twin programme could use connected digital twins to increase climate resilience. This first phase of the project investigates how to implement a digital twin to share data across sectors to investigate the impact of extreme weather, in particular flooding, on energy, water and telecoms networks. The current digital twin integrates flood simulations for different climate change scenarios with descriptions of the energy, water and telecoms networks, and models the interdependence of the infrastructure to describe the resilience of the combined network. CMCL Innovations were engaged by the Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB )and the Connected Places Catapult (CPC) as part of CReDo to develop a digital twin of assets from Anglian Water, BT and UK Power Networks. The digital twin combines a description of the logical connectivity between the assets with flood data to resolve the effect of floods on individual assets and the corresponding cascade of effects across the combined network. It demonstrates how to achieve basic interoperability between data from different sectors, and how this data might be combined with flood data for different climate scenarios to begin to explore the resilience of the combined network and identify vulnerabilities to support strategic decision making and capital planning. The first phase of the digital twin and an accompanying visualisation were implemented on DAFNI, the Data & Analytics Facility for National Infrastructure. This report describes the use and technical implementation of the current digital twin. Recommendations are made for how it could be extended to improve its ability to support decision making, and how the approach could be scaled up by the National Digital Twin programme.
  8. 51 downloads

    This research aimed to investigate the breadth and depth of digital twin blockers, galvanising the community towards greater engagement and collaboration to solve a complex set of national challenges. The DT Hub’s strategic approach was cyclical, beginning with highlighting the challenges and the opportunities faced by members. The project consisted of a series of strategy jams with the community interspersed by activity on the DT Hub in a ‘call-and-response’ manner. This approach became more effective as the project progressed. First, community thinking was used to seed the Roadblock Identification Jam, whose outputs in turn were put back into the community for further comment, refinement and validation. The next step was to kick off a discussion on the relative importance of different roadblocks to feed into the Roadblock Prioritisation Jam. Again, the outputs were subsequently checked in the wider community. The final DT Hub activity was preparatory to the Roadblock Prototyping Jam, consisting of a brainstorm to find ways around certain blockers, the results of which were fed into the final Jam – evaluating the problem definition and trying to find solutions. The research resulted in recommendations to support the DT Hub in tackling gaps, prioritising pressing issues and galvanising engagement to tackle the blockers. In summary, they are to: · Form a digital twin accelerator programme · Review the online community platform · Leverage the convening power of the DT Hub for engagement with others · Lead on the development of vision and value for digital twins · Evaluate and progress the Strategy Jam ideas · Introduce a problem-solving toolkit · Conduct a meta-analysis to compare this research with other findings and DT Hub resources. You can also access the full report.
  9. Catherine Condie

    Digital Twin Roadblocks report

    This research aimed to investigate the breadth and depth of digital twin blockers, galvanising the community towards greater engagement and collaboration to solve a complex set of national challenges. The DT Hub’s strategic approach was cyclical, beginning with highlighting the challenges and the opportunities faced by members. The project consisted of a series of strategy jams with the community interspersed by activity on the DT Hub in a ‘call-and-response’ manner. This approach became more effective as the project progressed. First, community thinking was used to seed the Roadblock Identification Jam, whose outputs in turn were put back into the community for further comment, refinement and validation. The next step was to kick off a discussion on the relative importance of different roadblocks to feed into the Roadblock Prioritisation Jam. Again, the outputs were subsequently checked in the wider community. The final DT Hub activity was preparatory to the Roadblock Prototyping Jam, consisting of a brainstorm to find ways around certain blockers, the results of which were fed into the final Jam – evaluating the problem definition and trying to find solutions. The research resulted in recommendations to support the DT Hub in tackling gaps, prioritising pressing issues and galvanising engagement to tackle the blockers. In summary, they are to: · Form a digital twin accelerator programme · Review the online community platform · Leverage the convening power of the DT Hub for engagement with others · Lead on the development of vision and value for digital twins · Evaluate and progress the Strategy Jam ideas · Introduce a problem-solving toolkit · Conduct a meta-analysis to compare this research with other findings and DT Hub resources. Read the report.
  10. This research aimed to investigate the breadth and depth of digital twin blockers, galvanising the community towards greater engagement and collaboration to solve a complex set of national challenges. The DT Hub’s strategic approach was cyclical, beginning with highlighting the challenges and the opportunities faced by members. The project consisted of a series of strategy jams with the community interspersed by activity on the DT Hub in a ‘call-and-response’ manner. This approach became more effective as the project progressed. First, community thinking was used to seed the Roadblock Identification Jam, whose outputs in turn were put back into the community for further comment, refinement and validation. The next step was to kick off a discussion on the relative importance of different roadblocks to feed into the Roadblock Prioritisation Jam. Again, the outputs were subsequently checked in the wider community. The final DT Hub activity was preparatory to the Roadblock Prototyping Jam, consisting of a brainstorm to find ways around certain blockers, the results of which were fed into the final Jam – evaluating the problem definition and trying to find solutions. The research resulted in recommendations to support the DT Hub in tackling gaps, prioritising pressing issues and galvanising engagement to tackle the blockers. In summary, they are to: · Form a digital twin accelerator programme · Review the online community platform · Leverage the convening power of the DT Hub for engagement with others · Lead on the development of vision and value for digital twins · Evaluate and progress the Strategy Jam ideas · Introduce a problem-solving toolkit · Conduct a meta-analysis to compare this research with other findings and DT Hub resources. Read the report.
  11. We may be drawing to the close of the current iteration of the NDTp, but there is still plenty of exciting and important work happening. It is encouraging to see just how hard everyone is working to ‘finish well’ and ensure that all the learnings and progress we have made is packaged into a useful blueprint for others to use. Some highlights to share: The DT Hub Community Council One of the goals we set for the DT Hub was for the community to lead the development and strategy going forward. An important milestone on that journey has been the start of a Community Council, supported by a network of Community Champions. What struck me about the process of establishing the Council was the amount of feedback and applications we received from interested Hub members. It showed a level of enthusiasm and commitment that is very encouraging for the next stage of the DT Hub. We now have 12 motivated community representatives across different types of organisations, sizes and locations. Our first Council meeting was held at the end of January, joined by members from Australia and Sweden, as well as the UK. It was a great first meeting, and clear that there is a real desire to keep the momentum of the DT Hub going and to continue the ethos of sharing and collaboration. And I’m delighted to say that we will have @Melissa Zanocco @Ali Nicholl as Co-chairs. Progress on CReDo When CReDo was launched, alongside the CReDo film and demonstrator app, there were a wide range of publications that wrote about the story. What has been interesting to me is that long after the event, the project is still very much being referenced by journalists and key organisations. People are continuing to follow the progress and keep abreast of all the latest insights from the project. It has moved the conversation forward on collaboration through connected digital twins, by delivering a tangible example that demonstrates the benefit to our everyday lives. It is being discussed and recognised as something important for critical infrastructure and also for governments. One of the key partners on the project, BT, highlighted the benefits of this work and digitalisation for BT. Over the coming weeks the team are putting together both technical and non-technical reports on CReDo to capture the lessons learned, what we could have done better, what we will do better going forward and recommendations for others. The team is planning a webinar on 2nd March 2022 to show how the climate resilience model has been realised using synthetic data sets. The event will be a talk-through of project methodologies and findings, insights and next steps. We’ve already had over 500 sign-ups and it’s great to see so much interest. Please sign up to take part. Smart Infrastructure Index results Developed specifically for the built environment and infrastructure industry, the Index provides a holistic view of digital maturity: from customer insights to digital twins; modern methods of construction to whole-life asset management. There were 57 responses to the 2021 Index, up from 21 in 2020. Whereas in 2020 these responses came exclusively from asset owners / operators, in 2021 the survey was sent to the wider DT Hub community. While this increased the reach of the survey, it also influenced the scoring. The overall digital maturity score for the DT Hub community was 37.3 in 2020 and it decreased to 33.6 in 2021. When looking at scores for asset owners / operators only, this decrease in digital maturity score was still evident, however, it was far less significant, with average score of 37.1 in 2021. For a further breakdown of the results please go to the report: results of the 2021 Index.
  12. Catherine Condie

    Launching the Digital Twin Hub Community Council

    “The point of digital twins is to enable us to make better decisions that lead to better outcomes for people and nature. It is therefore important that the Digital Twin Hub is community driven, with input from people who will be using and benefitting from them. The setting up of the Digital Twin Hub Community Council is an important step for capturing that voice. I am looking forward to working with my Co-Chair, the Council and the Community to ensure that the Hub continues to support our needs as we work together towards a National Digital Twin.” Melissa Zanocco, Infrastructure Client Group Our primary aim at the DT (Digital Twin) Hub is to ensure the community is a vibrant, member-owned, resource-rich idea space, and in 2021 we took a number of steps to boost community engagement and conversation both inside and outside the web platform. One of these steps was to start a community led council. In November, we issued a call for members to form the new DT Hub Community Council. The call attracted a fantastic 70 responses, and we were truly encouraged by the application statements and words of support we received. Such was the enthusiasm that by December we had finalised our first 12 Community Council members and formed a large Community Champions network. The council will take an important advisory role in the future direction of the DT Hub. With their diverse skillsets and knowledge across industries and nations, both the council member and champions’ groups will be the eyes and ears of the community – giving it a strong voice as we develop our shared vision of an ecosystem of connected digital twins. The first Community Council meeting took place on 25 January 2022, sparking many discussions on ways to come together to further engagement opportunities for the wider membership. We are also delighted to announce that the council has appointed its co-chairs: Ali Nicholl from Iotics and Melissa Zanocco from the Infrastructure Client Group. Ali Nicholl said: “I am excited to part of the DT Hub’s Community Council and look forward to working with the council and the diverse community it represents. The DT Hub isn’t in the business of seeking consensus on a single point of view, a single application or a single standard. Instead, we see a community developing approaches where cooperation between twins, individuals, organisations and sectors can deliver the platforms for human flourishing that societies globally so desperately need. It’s in that spirt of cooperation that we have co-chairs and I can’t wait to work together to support the community in achieving our shared vision.” Ali and Melissa’s fellow council members, with digital twin/digital transformation experience spanning strategy, systems, standards to people development, are Peter Burnett, Network Rail; John Erkoyuncu, Cranfield University; Polly Hudson, UCL/Alan Turing Institute; Paul May, John Lewis Partnership; Laura Mills, KPMG; Dan Rossiter, BSI (British Standards Institution) Group; Timothy Ståhle, Akademiska Hus (Sweden); Glenn Worrall, Bentley Systems UK; Amanda Wyzenbeek, Mott MacDonald (Australia); and Jamie Young, Wates. We welcome the new DT Hub Community Council and our Community Champions and look forward to updating members on their progress in the coming months. You can find out more about the Council Members and contact the team via the Community Council page. Why not join the Community Champions network to share your ideas for the DT Hub community?
  13. BSI Flex 260 Built environment - Digital twins overview and general principles This work began with the Standards Roadmap developed by the British Standards Institute to explore the existing standards landscape and define a route charting the subsequent standards opportunities. It will evolve with the development of standards within the BSI’s recommended framework for digital twins in the built environment. We have chosen to test the BSI Flex approach to explore its applicability in the context of connected digital twins. It allows for iterative modification of the standard as common knowledge around digital twins develop, lessons are learned, and practical experience is gained across domains and geographies. The consultation period for this Flex standard runs for six weeks until Monday 7 March 2022. Please see: BSI Flex standard landing page BSI Flex standard commenting page
  14. We are pleased to announce the publication of the (Smart Infrastructure Index) Digital Maturity Benchmarking report. Summary of responses This year, we received 57 responses from the DT Hub community as a whole, this compares with 21 responses in 2020 from asset owners/operators. While increasing the reach of the survey, it also influenced the scoring. The overall digital maturity score for the DT Hub community was 37.3 in 2020, decreasing to 33.6 in 2021. When looking at scores for asset owners / operators only, the decrease was evident, however far less significant, with the average score of 37.1 in 2021. The overarching observation of this year’s Smart Infrastructure Index results is that on average, the digital maturity score of the DT Hub community has decreased. However, the overall digital maturity of the DT Hub community’s member organisations has not necessarily dropped. There are two key factors which lead to this conclusion: first, that the demographic of respondents has changed, with the survey being sent to vendors and academia as well as asset owners / operators; and second, that the DT Hub community last year was much smaller than it is now, with far fewer organisations, who likely fall into the category of ‘early adopters’ of digital twins and digital more generally. Analysis and recommendations to improve digital maturity This report compares results from the 2021 Digital Twin question set with those from 2020, arranging observations and insights into subcategories then continuing with an analysis of the core Smart Infrastructure Index questions. It concludes with specific recommendations to improve digital maturity scores across both these categories. About the Smart Infrastructure Index The Smart Infrastructure Index allows organisations to: Better understand their maturity in relation to both digital transformation and digital twins Compare and contrast DT Hub members with broader Index metrics Draw comparisons with the wider community Understand progress in the last year Identify future areas of focus. The DT Hub version of the Smart Infrastructure Index includes core questions that assess digital maturity across the asset lifecycle and an extension focused on digital twins in the context of the National Digital Twin programme (NDTp). Download the report
  15. You’re invited to a webinar on 2nd March to find out how collaboration through connected digital twins can help plan resilient cities and infrastructure. The National Digital Twin programme has developed a Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo), a pioneering climate change adaptation digital twin project that provides a practical example of how connected data can improve climate adaptation and resilience across a system of systems. Watch the film Tomorrow Today, and try the interactive app to see what CReDo has been working towards. The CReDo team will use synthetic data developed through the project to show how it is possible to better understand infrastructure interdependencies and increase resilience. Join the webinar to hear from the CReDo team about the work that has happened behind the scenes of developing a connected digital twin. CReDo is the result of a first-of-its-kind collaboration between Anglian Water, BT and UK Power Networks, in partnership with several academic institutions. The project has been funded by Connected Places Catapult (CPC) and the University of Cambridge, and technical development was led by CMCL and the Hartree Centre. This collaboration produced a demonstrator that looks at the impact of flooding on energy, water and telecoms networks. CReDo demonstrates how owners and operators of these networks can use secure, resilient, information sharing across sector boundaries to adapt to and mitigate the effect of flooding on network performance and service delivery. It also provides an important template to build on to turn it to other challenges, such as climate change mitigation and Net Zero. Hear from members of the CReDo team – including the asset owners, CPC, and the technical development team - about the demonstrator they have delivered and the lessons they learned. If you’re interested in using connected digital twins to forge the path to Net Zero, then this event is for you. Register for our end-of-project webinar on 2nd March, 10:30 – 12:00: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/credo-collaborating-and-resilience-through-connected-digital-twins-tickets-228349628887
  16. At this morning's Gemini call NDTp update, @Peter El Hajjpresented a timeline of milestones from across the programme in 2021. From breaking through the 3000 member barrier here in the DT Hub community, to projects that have received wide recognition such as the CReDo film, a lot has happened that you may not know about. Here is the timeline and I have taken the liberty of sharing links to information on all of the key milestones below: Digital Twin Toolkit and Collaborative Workshop 2020 Benchmark Report Skills and Competency framework Capability Enhancement programme Agile Standards white paper The 7 Circles of Information Management and Process Model-based Information Requirement Cyber Physical Summit 1 Year of Gemini Calls The journey towards ‘grounded semantics’ CReDo webinar and film Ethics and the Gemini Principles report Would you like to give some recognition for a job well done in 2021? Whether it's for any of the CDBB team or even within your own organisation, feel free to share it below. On a final note, it's been a pleasure to be your Community Manager for the last 2 months, to have seen so many faces on Gemini Calls and I'm excited to establish our brand new DT Hub Community Council in 2022!
  17. Research Sopra Steria has undertaken extensive academic and industry research into the ethics surrounding digital twins. This research provided the foundations for three stakeholder workshops, held in collaboration with the National Digital Twin programme (NDTp), exploring the ethical considerations behind digital twins and the National Digital Twin. Stakeholders were invited due to their expertise and experience with ethics, data and digital twins. There was an array of perspectives from organisations spanning government, academia, and industry and this collaboration sparked invaluable insight. These workshops were focused specifically on understanding the Gemini Principles from an ethical perspective. Sopra Steria’s seven categories of digital ethics, drawn from academic and industry standards, were adopted as a framework with which to approach the Gemini Principles. The workshops then explored the relationships between the framework values and the Gemini Principles. Combining the initial research with the analysis from the workshops has provided insight and clarity on the ethical aspects of the National Digital Twin for the NDTp and users of the Gemini Principles. This is essential for the operationalisation of the Gemini Principles, turning them from aspiration to reality. To read more about the findings from our study, the report can found at this link or attached here. So what next? In order to ensure that ethics sits at the core of all Digital Twins and the National Digital Twin, engagement from the whole community is essential. Therefore we would love to use this thread to start a conversation around ethics and Digital Twins. Please post any questions, opinions, contemplations, thought leadership or even late night thoughts; discussion and collaboration from a range of perspectives is how we will achieve a truly ethical National Digital Twin. We will get it started..... From the research conducted, what was the conclusion about governance supporting data ethics? Is it sufficient and if not what is the role of digital twin developers to bridge the gap? Digital Twins Ethics and the Gemini Principles.pdf
  18. Several of the DT Hub and CDBB team are attending Digital Construction Week at Excel in London and we would love to see you! If you are also attending, you will find us at the NDTp stand today and tomorrow. Feel free to say hello, ask any questions about any of the projects and we hope you enjoy the event. Here is the programme if you haven't already registered or want to see what's happening: Programme - Digital Construction Week Let us know below if you are attending and if you have any thoughts that have come out of the event, please start a discussion.
  19. Bringing CreDo to life With COP26 on the horizon, we are fully immersed in preparing to showcase the Climate Resilience Demonstrator - CReDo. We have appointed two partners to help us communicate the story in an engaging and inspiring way and demonstrate the huge potential of information sharing. Firstly, we are working with Crocodile Media to develop a short, dramatic film that will tell the story of a flooding event and how connected digital twins may provide a better response to climate disasters. The second partnership is with ESRI, a provider of online maps and 3D models of cities, who are developing an interactive demonstrator that will allow the public to test out various scenarios on a made-up city. The purpose of both will be to demonstrate how information sharing across organisational boundaries is a key enabler to improving resilience of infrastructure systems. We have organised an event “Increasing our climate resilience through connected digital twins” on the 2nd of Nov to watch the film, see the interactive tool in action and find out more about how connected digital twins can help to tackle climate change. We’re delighted that the project doesn’t end with COP26 – instead, the technical development of CReDo will continue until next year and will be delivered through a collaboration of research centres and industry partners; The Universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Exeter, Newcastle and Warwick will work alongside the Hartree Centre, DAFNI, Science and Technology Facilities Council, CMCL Innovations, the Joint Centre of Excellence in Environmental Intelligence, CPNI and Mott MacDonald. We are also delighted to be working in partnership with three major UK utility providers; Anglian Water, BT and UK Power Networks who are equally committed to making bold steps towards resilient infrastructure. Progress on IMF’s seven circles We have been moving forward with all seven circles of the Information Management Framework from top level ontologies, to integration architecture to information quality management. One document I particularly want to highlight is ‘Managing Shared Data’, an exciting piece of work being developed by @Matthew West, Technical Lead for the NDTp. He is bringing together the lessons we’ve learned over the past three years since publication of the Pathway toward an IMF report and providing clarity on what it means for organisations to manage information effectively, an essential enabler for connecting digital twin. It is in development and we’re hoping to release the final document by the end of the year. DT Hub There are three main activities to highlight for October: DT Hub website update. We’re keen to keep improving the useability and layout of the site so the new version of the DT Hub will include a public facing page, with all the resources to make it easier to access public documents. It also includes a page to host all information related to CReDo. DT Roadblocks workshop series. As the community progresses on their digital twin journeys, it is inevitable there will be a myriad of challenges. The great aspect of being part of a community is that there are others who have faced similar challenges and can share their learnings or provide insights in to how to overcome your particular hurdle. Our first workshop is aptly named, “Problems shared, problems halved”. If you would like to be part of a constructive discussion, do sign up to this series, running until the end of the year. Smart Infrastructure Index. We have just launched our latest SII survey to enable members to measure their digital maturity and benchmark progress against peers. When members complete and submit the survey, the SII will generate a personalised report including a score and targeted recommendations. The idea is that it enables users to identify areas for improvement and to support the prioritisation of future activities. The survey is open until mid-November and can be accessed here.
  20. Alexandra Robasto

    Autumn 2021 Newsletter

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  21. until
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) project from the National Digital Twin programme is holding a webinar to launch the project to a global audience in conjunction with the COP26 climate conference on 2nd November at 10:30-12. This webinar replaces the weekly Gemini Call, and the DT Hub community are encouraged to sign up, as well as inviting their wider networks to attend. The climate emergency is here now, and connected digital twins are an important part of achieving net zero and climate resilience. The CReDo team will present how the project meets this urgent need, and will premiere two exciting outputs – a short film and an interactive visualisation of how connected data across three infrastructure networks can provide better insights and lead to better resilience of the system-of-systems overall. Only if we come together to securely share data across sectors can we plan a smarter, greener, more resilient built environment. Book your spot today! Keep an eye on the DT Hub website for updates about the CReDo programme.
  22. Since its creation in 2018, the National Digital Twin programme (NDTp) has had three objectives: Enable a National Digital Twin – an ecosystem of connected digital twins to foster better outcomes from our built environment Deliver an Information Management Framework – ensure secure resilient data sharing and effective information management Align a Digital Framework Task Group to [provide coordination and alignment among key players. In 2021 and with the Digital Framework Task Group of senior leaders from industry, academia and government overseeing progress, it is at a point where key projects are being realised and support for its work is gathering momentum. Here is a summary of the latest developments. The Digital Twin Hub community is now in excess of 2,000 members and its remit to create technical foundations and to provide a co-ordinated community in which to share expertise and knowhow on digital twins is being met with enthusiasm and support from a diverse range of participants across the UK and beyond. This year is proving pivotal in terms of active engagement with our members to better understand their digital maturity and needs, especially through surveys, community activities and international summits. And in parallel is the publication of key documents and resources including the Digital Twin Toolkit and upcoming Collaborative Workshop to help companies make their business cases, and the Digital Twin Standards roadmap, a culmination of work by the British Standards Institute (BSI), which enables a framework for information management and sets out our programme for the next few years. Key to these activities is the willingness of members from both academic and industrial fields to share their own knowledge and experiences. The DT Hub is launching a new series titled Digital Twin Journeys to focus on academic research and lessons learned from digital twin projects focused on construction: buildings, infrastructure and industrial, and satellite applications. In parallel, we will engage with industry to run a consultation on our Flex 260 Standards as well as a second Smart Infrastructure Index (SII) Survey which tracks, in the first instance, digital and organisational maturity levels of asset owner and operator members. At the end of August, we also announced the launch of three thematic workshops to address Digital Twin Roadblocks by progressing the conversation and surfacing the challenges faced by organisations while embarking on their digital twin journeys. The aim is for members to discuss experiences and to elicit the main challenges and blockers encountered in their programmes to date. These monthly workshops will commence at the end of September 2021. Our work on the Information Management Framework, to allow the smooth adoption of digital twin technologies, has also gathered pace with the introduction of a methodology to divide the information management space into manageable segments. The 7 circles approach provides the building blocks for informed decision making and will deliver better information management and information sharing on a national scale. The NDTp’s CReDo project will be running a webinar on 2 November 2021 to coincide with COP26 to give insight into our plans to develop a digital twin across water, energy and telecoms to improve resilience across the infrastructure system. CReDo – Climate Resilience Demonstrator – is applying an Information Management Framework approach to share data across water, energy and telecoms service providers, combined with hydrology and climate data from the Met Office, to help plan for and adapt to the cascading effects of increased flooding due to climate change. Registration for the webinar will be opening soon.
  23. Peter El Hajj

    NDTp August 2021 Editorial

    The summer was marked by our milestone event, the Cyber-Physical Fabric Summit, which took place on July 19th. It was a huge success with more than 800 people registered, and close to 400 people on the live calls and a series of insightful roundtable discussions. There was a live Zoom chat running in parallel to the summit, with the comments every bit as engaging as the content. Each roundtable had a further thread on the DT Hub to ensure that others could catch up on the discussion. The summit was not only useful in terms of pooling knowledge and ideas, but in creating movement towards the shared goal of developing an ecosystem of interconnected smart machines and digital twins. It left me feeling energized to hear from others who are equally excited about this journey and to have a cross section of academia, government and industry take part. The main takeaways for me were: The need for boundary spanning leadership. Our speakers underlined the importance of taking an interconnected and collaborative approach to working across sectors, industries and organisations. I liked the analogy of an octopus – something that joins the intelligent tentacles and makes them work together. Deep socio. In the same way that we have ‘deep tech’, there was a lot of discussion around ‘deep socio’ and ensuring the social side of creating our cyber physical fabric has equal weight to the tech side. There is a real need to address issues around ethics, privacy and commercial and regulatory requirements. Creating and adopting in tandem. It was great to see so much consensus around the importance of adoption. We need to constantly be implementing the latest research, so we can test and refine as we go along. Living labs. There was discussion around how we need to keep testing what we’ve created to really see what is working and what isn’t and what the impact is on real people. There’s a really interesting example taking place at MIT where their Living Labs programme is developing a scalable data management platform, allowing them to collect and integrate multiple types of data including: personal data or “small data” (collected by smart phones, activity tracking devices, or new wearable sensors); MIT data (wifi data, campus maps, event data etc); as well as external data types (social media data, transportation data, weather, city data etc). A further example worth following is the Smart Mobility Living Lab London where they are using smart mobility living as a test-bed for data innovation. DT Hub We continue to grow fast and have crossed the 2,000 member mark. We now have members from more than 1,000 individual organisations across 60 different countries. There has also been an increase in participation with many more new postings and threads being generated by our members. Do log on to add to the discussions! Also look out for our Flex 260 Standards, which opens for public consultation. Again we really value your feedback. As we grow, so does our need for additional staff and I’m delighted to welcome two great additions to the team: @Kirsten Lamband @Catherine Condie. Both come with a wealth of experience and will be driving our communications and engagement activities across the programme. CreDo Update CReDo, the Climate Resilience Demonstrator, is a climate change adaptation digital twin demonstrator project to improve resilience across infrastructure systems. We launched a new DTHub page for CReDo where we will be sharing progress and the benefits of cross sectoral information sharing to improve climate resilience across infrastructure. We are exploring examples of interdependencies map for infrastructure systems. Check out this thread and share any thoughts you might have. An important part of our Credo programme is communicating the technology and research to a diverse audience in an inspiring way. We have tenders out to create a video and would be grateful if you could circulate the following with your network
  24. Alexandra Robasto

    Summer 2021 Newsletter

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