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  1. I am conducting a preliminary online survey as part of my PhD research at the University of Salford, the UK, to investigate digital twins enabling lean strategic facility management. The preliminary survey's purpose is to aid test the research proposition, evaluate the potential of the research solution, and define key performance measures and criteria that describe the efficacy of a proposed digital twin framework to lean strategic facility management. Participation is available by clicking on the following link: https://salford.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/digitaltwinlean-sfm All questions are optional, and all information will be kept strictly confidential. The survey closes on August 15th, 2022. I am calling upon you to support us by participating in this preliminary online survey. I would appreciate it if you could take the time to complete the survey. Thank you in advance, and don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.
  2. Gemma Beard and Mark Wharton of IOTICS present 'Foundation of the digital twin ecosystem - SHAPE UK' for the weekly Gemini Call Feature Focus.
  3. While there is a lot of discussion around ethics in technology, and growing interest in these pages in ethics and digital twins, there is a significant gap that needs to be addressed. This is the gap that exists between ethical principles and ethical practice. Kirsten Lamb noted in her discussion on this site back in March that, "The Gemini Principles set out the need for digital twins to be ethical and secure, but ... this can be surprisingly difficult to ensure." This is a problem that challenges a lot of areas of application for digital ethics, most notably in AI and automation (how do you make an AI "fair"?), with obvious implications for digital twins. There are numerous different approaches being trialled to bridge this gap. To date, one of the most successful is an ethics by design approach. This considers the design process for a digital twin and then identifies different ethical issues that arise at each stage of the design. While it doesn't give a convenient tick box approach to ethics (and probably never will or should, given the complexities of the challenge) it breaks down an approach to ethical development into more manageable chunks. Rather than saying "a digital twin should respect privacy", it encourages developers to consider the impacts of their digital twin on privacy at specific stages of the develpment process. To that end, Sopra Steria has published a report on operationalising digital twin ethics in travel and transport. This sets out an ethics by design approach to developing digital twins. It breaks down the development cycle and raises key considerations at each of the stages. Please do not think that if you don't work in travel and transport then this isn't for you! Context is always going to be important in determining ethical issues with digital twins (as noted here) but there can still be learning across contexts. An operationalisation approach in travel and transport can still inform an operationalisation approach in farming, for example, or finance. The key message is getting the ethical issues beyond abstract requirements at the start of a project, and to bake them in to an approach that sees ethical reflection as a fundamental part of the development life cycle. If you would like to discuss ethics and digital twins further then please do get in touch.
  4. Motion sensors, CO₂ sensors and the like are considered to be benign forms of monitoring, since they don’t capture images or personal data about us as we move through the buildings we visit. Or at least, that’s what we want to believe. Guest blogger Professor Matthew Chalmers (University of Glasgow) helped develop a mobile game called About Us as part of the CDBB funded Project OAK. The game takes players through a mission using information from building sensors to help them achieve their aims — with a twist at the end. He writes about why we all need to engage with the ethics of data collection in smart built environments. Mobile games are more than just entertainment. They can also teach powerful lessons by giving the player the ability to make decisions, and then showing them the consequences of those decisions. About Us features a simulated twin of a building in Cambridge, with strategically placed CO₂ sensors in public spaces (such as corridors), and raises ethical questions about the Internet of Things (IoT) in buildings. The premise of the game is simple. While you complete a series of tasks around the building, you must avoid the characters who you don’t want to interact with (as they will lower your game score), and you should contact your helpers — characters who will boost your score. You can view a map of the building, and plan your avatar’s route to accomplish your tasks, based on which route you think is safest. On the map, you can watch the building’s sensors being triggered. By combining this anonymous sensor data with map details of which offices are located where, you can gather intelligence about the movements of particular characters. In this way, you can find your helpers and avoid annoying interactions. If you’ve avoided the bad characters and interacted with the good characters while completing your tasks, you win the game. However, a twist comes after you have finished: the game shows you how much could be inferred about your game character, from the exact same sensors that you had been using to make inferences about other characters. Every task in the game exposes some sensitive data about the player’s avatar, and reinforces the player’s uncomfortable realisation that they have exploited apparently neutral data to find and avoid others. What does this tell us about the ethics of digital twins? Our journeys through the built environment can reveal more than we intend them to, e.g. our movements, our routines, where we congregate, and where we go to avoid others. All this information could inadvertently be revealed by a building digital twin, even though the data used seems (at first glance) to be anonymous and impersonal. The game used CO₂ levels as an example of apparently impersonal data that, when combined with other information (local knowledge in this case), becomes more personal. More generally, data might be low risk when isolated within its originating context, but risk levels are higher given that data can be combined with other systems and other (possibly non-digital) forms of information. The Gemini Principles set out the need for digital twins to be ethical and secure, but About Us demonstrates that this can be surprisingly difficult to ensure. Collecting data through digital twins provides aggregate insights — that’s why they’re so useful — but it also creates risks that need ongoing governance. It’s vitally important that citizens understand the double-edged problem of digital twins, so that citizens are more able to advocate for how they want the technology to be used, and not used, and for how governance should be implemented. Gamification is now a well-established technique for understanding and changing user attitudes toward digital technology. About Us was designed to create a safe but challenging environment, in which players can explore an example of data that could be collected in distributed computing environments, the uses to which such data can be put, and the intelligence that can be gathered from resulting inferences. The ultimate purpose of Project OAK is to enable anyone concerned with how data is managed (e.g., data processors, data subjects, governance bodies) to build appropriate levels of trust in the data and in its processing. Only if we recognise the ethical and legal issues represented by digital twins can we start to give meaningful answers to questions about what good system design and good system governance look like in this domain. Information about this project is available on their GitHub page. This research forms part of the Centre for Digital Built Britain’s (CDBB) work at the University of Cambridge. It was enabled by the Construction Innovation Hub, of which CDBB is a core partner, and funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF). To join the conversation with others who are on their own digital twin journeys, join the Digital Twin Hub.
  5. Catherine Condie

    Digital Twin Roadblocks report

    This research aimed to investigate the breadth and depth of digital twin blockers, galvanising the community towards greater engagement and collaboration to solve a complex set of national challenges. The DT Hub’s strategic approach was cyclical, beginning with highlighting the challenges and the opportunities faced by members. The project consisted of a series of strategy jams with the community interspersed by activity on the DT Hub in a ‘call-and-response’ manner. This approach became more effective as the project progressed. First, community thinking was used to seed the Roadblock Identification Jam, whose outputs in turn were put back into the community for further comment, refinement and validation. The next step was to kick off a discussion on the relative importance of different roadblocks to feed into the Roadblock Prioritisation Jam. Again, the outputs were subsequently checked in the wider community. The final DT Hub activity was preparatory to the Roadblock Prototyping Jam, consisting of a brainstorm to find ways around certain blockers, the results of which were fed into the final Jam – evaluating the problem definition and trying to find solutions. The research resulted in recommendations to support the DT Hub in tackling gaps, prioritising pressing issues and galvanising engagement to tackle the blockers. In summary, they are to: · Form a digital twin accelerator programme · Review the online community platform · Leverage the convening power of the DT Hub for engagement with others · Lead on the development of vision and value for digital twins · Evaluate and progress the Strategy Jam ideas · Introduce a problem-solving toolkit · Conduct a meta-analysis to compare this research with other findings and DT Hub resources. Read the report.
  6. You are invited to join us to explore one of the biggest challenges we face as an industry: Information Interoperability. The ability to exchange data throughout the process of designing, building and operating assets post hand-over and how the latter translates into different technologies in the digital age we live in at present. Help us to join the dots and explore how interoperable information can plug the data gaps among us and open up opportunities ahead of us - More details on the Hackathon challenge will be released on the day itself! Register here.
  7. Next week’s Gemini Call will include a presentation by Jack Ostrofsky, Head of Quality and Design at Southern Housing Group and Chair of BIM for Housing Associations. BIM for Housing Associations (BIM4HAs) is a client led and client funded initiative set up in 2018 to accelerate the uptake of consistent and open standards-based BIM processes across the Housing Association sector. An urgent priority for this group is building and fire safety, particularly in the context of the development of a Golden Thread of Building Safety Information which is part of the Building Safety Bill which is expected to receive Royal Assent in 2022. Understanding of BIM and Digital Twins in the residential housing sector is poor, yet as long-term owner-operators of built assets, housing associations are ideally placed to benefit from the efficiencies of BIM and Digital Twins. In June 2021 BIM4HAs published a Toolkit of resources for housing associations aimed at assisting them in the process of adopting ‘Better Information Management’. The toolkit, which is free to use, translates the requirements of the National BIM Framework into accessible language and practical tools for housing associations. Jack will describe an example of the challenge to housing associations to use structured data to manage their assets; the transfer of spatial information about buildings which designers and contractors label as ‘plots’, development managers and asset managers in housing associations have their own naming conventions which have evolved in a traditional and disjointed manner. As a result, the metadata links are severed at handover and a great deal of valuable, useable information is lost to the client. Jack’s employer Southern Housing Group has developed a spatial hierarchy and property reference numbering system which was published in the BIM4HAs Toolkit in June. The spatial hierarchy and naming system links to commonly understood asset management language and informs Asset Information Requirements that housing associations can use to instruct development and refurbishment projects. This process enables contractors to provide useable metadata to housing associations and will form an essential part of the implementation of a Golden Thread of Building Safety Information. In a further development Southern Housing Group, working with members of the BIM4HAs community, have developed and are implementing an Asset Information Model based on the Gemini Principles and aligned with the other BIM4HAs work. This Model will be published for free, for anyone to use, by BIM4HAs as part of an update to the BIM4HAs Toolkit in February. Please join us on the Gemini Call on 25th January at 10.30 to hear about the spatial hierarchy work and put your questions to Jack. Download the Spatial Hierarchy Document and ‘The Business Case for BIM’ Document from the links below. Both are part of the Toolkit. The whole Toolkit can be downloaded for free from the National Housing Federation website here: housing.org.uk/BIM4HAs BIM for Housing Associations Pt1 The Business Case for BIM.pdf SHG Spatial Hierarchy UPRN Procedures.pdf
  8. You’re invited to a webinar on 2nd March to find out how collaboration through connected digital twins can help plan resilient cities and infrastructure. The National Digital Twin programme has developed a Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo), a pioneering climate change adaptation digital twin project that provides a practical example of how connected data can improve climate adaptation and resilience across a system of systems. Watch the film Tomorrow Today, and try the interactive app to see what CReDo has been working towards. The CReDo team will use synthetic data developed through the project to show how it is possible to better understand infrastructure interdependencies and increase resilience. Join the webinar to hear from the CReDo team about the work that has happened behind the scenes of developing a connected digital twin. CReDo is the result of a first-of-its-kind collaboration between Anglian Water, BT and UK Power Networks, in partnership with several academic institutions. The project has been funded by Connected Places Catapult (CPC) and the University of Cambridge, and technical development was led by CMCL and the Hartree Centre. This collaboration produced a demonstrator that looks at the impact of flooding on energy, water and telecoms networks. CReDo demonstrates how owners and operators of these networks can use secure, resilient, information sharing across sector boundaries to adapt to and mitigate the effect of flooding on network performance and service delivery. It also provides an important template to build on to turn it to other challenges, such as climate change mitigation and Net Zero. Hear from members of the CReDo team – including the asset owners, CPC, and the technical development team - about the demonstrator they have delivered and the lessons they learned. If you’re interested in using connected digital twins to forge the path to Net Zero, then this event is for you. Register for our end-of-project webinar on 2nd March, 10:30 – 12:00: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/credo-collaborating-and-resilience-through-connected-digital-twins-tickets-228349628887
  9. Research Sopra Steria has undertaken extensive academic and industry research into the ethics surrounding digital twins. This research provided the foundations for three stakeholder workshops, held in collaboration with the National Digital Twin programme (NDTp), exploring the ethical considerations behind digital twins and the National Digital Twin. Stakeholders were invited due to their expertise and experience with ethics, data and digital twins. There was an array of perspectives from organisations spanning government, academia, and industry and this collaboration sparked invaluable insight. These workshops were focused specifically on understanding the Gemini Principles from an ethical perspective. Sopra Steria’s seven categories of digital ethics, drawn from academic and industry standards, were adopted as a framework with which to approach the Gemini Principles. The workshops then explored the relationships between the framework values and the Gemini Principles. Combining the initial research with the analysis from the workshops has provided insight and clarity on the ethical aspects of the National Digital Twin for the NDTp and users of the Gemini Principles. This is essential for the operationalisation of the Gemini Principles, turning them from aspiration to reality. To read more about the findings from our study, the report can found at this link or attached here. So what next? In order to ensure that ethics sits at the core of all Digital Twins and the National Digital Twin, engagement from the whole community is essential. Therefore we would love to use this thread to start a conversation around ethics and Digital Twins. Please post any questions, opinions, contemplations, thought leadership or even late night thoughts; discussion and collaboration from a range of perspectives is how we will achieve a truly ethical National Digital Twin. We will get it started..... From the research conducted, what was the conclusion about governance supporting data ethics? Is it sufficient and if not what is the role of digital twin developers to bridge the gap? Digital Twins Ethics and the Gemini Principles.pdf
  10. Produce a benefits report and valuation for the National Digital Twin Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) Calling valuation experts who like a challenge. How would you value data and resilience? Help us quantify the benefits of CReDo and articulate the direct and indirect benefits of a CReDo-type approach to climate adaptation. Access the tender documents here: University of Cambridge Electronic Tendering Site - Project Manage - Tender (in-tendhost.co.uk) Register interest through the link by 14 December and submit proposals by 4 January.
  11. Ali Nicholl and Sophie Peachey (IOTICS) present a Feature Focus on Cooperative Ecosystems - Evolution of Trust
  12. I'm wondering what peoples thought are on the direction of travel of data as we build more and more twins. For instance, data gathering can be parasitic, symbiotic or slave; it can be data taken and not returned, data taken and a response given and shared and it can simply fed into something. I'm wondering that if most systems which are built a parasitic where's the benifit of those twins, if they a the majority does that then undermine the wider twin network and if this happens it will be very hard to unpick and maybe miss represent twins. I do have an underlying concern but that's not for this conversation and please, if you want to reply and tell me your system/IT thing can solve my problem please to do not reply. With the best will in the world I'm not in the market for tech solutions, I'm interested in peoples thoughts.
  13. ‘CReDo is a small step to something potentially huge. It is something tangible that people can see and interact with, taking away the mystique of digital twins’, Matt Webb, Head of Enterprise Data, UK Power Networks The message coming out of the National Digital Twin programme’s webinar, ‘Increasing our climate resilience through connected digital twins’, is that working together is vital for safeguarding our future. The CReDo project leads the way in showing how collaboration and the sharing of data can dramatically improve our resilience to extreme weather conditions caused by climate change. Held at the same time as the COP26 climate conference, the webinar on 2 November 2021 launched the Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) to over 220 attendees from 17 countries and multiple industry sectors. It introduced the CReDo team and collaboration partners and covered the scope of the project, also hosting a panel interview and open Q&A session. Chaired by Arup’s Global Digital Energy / Digital Twin Leader and Gemini Call Chair, Simon Evans, the event began with the internet premiere of the new CReDo film, a poignant piece about the climate emergency and how it affects us all, especially the most vulnerable. The film offers a view of a world where engineers can make critical decisions based on data from connected digital twins, and improve resilience in a way which makes a difference to people’s lives. CReDo project lead, Sarah Hayes, reflected on the reality of the film and explained how CReDo is developing a climate change adaptation digital twin looking at the impact of flooding on infrastructure interdependencies across energy, water and telecoms networks. Alongside, Sarah introduced the CReDo app, produced by the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI UK), which invites users to see how connected digital twins can change outcomes for those faced with extreme weather in the fictional town of Sunford City. Sarah explained how the app has been developed to show what a CReDo digital twin can do and that both the film and the app are based on the same fictional storm Ruby, a storm caused by climate change. The app was developed with manufactured data to present a realistic scenario that asset owners could be faced with. Behind the scenes, the technical team is working with the real data to develop the CReDo digital twin. CReDo Technical Architect, Tom Collingwood summarised the key elements of the project, which bring together climate projection data with flood data, and asset data to calculate system impact to inform a greater understanding of the system effects caused by asset failure. These insights can then be used to inform decisions concerning operational and capital planning to increase resilience across the infrastructure system as a whole. The digital twin demonstrator will show the bigger picture about what can be achieved through knowledge exchange and cross-sectoral cooperation. ‘We’re talking about people, and that’s what matters at the end of the day,’ Tom said, bringing his presentation on the challenges and successes of CReDo’s technical approach to a close. CReDo project partners, represented by Tom Burgoyne, Anglian Water; Louise Krug, BT; Matt Webb, UK Power Networks; and Tamar Loach, Connected Places Catapult, agree that the ambition relies on close collaboration and a joined-up approach to make it work. Data sharing between networks, enabled using an information management framework, will help us to create resilient infrastructure systems and allow us to adapt to extreme weather events caused by climate change. The active Q&A session underlined the need for the CReDo approach, emphasising the opportunities that joined-up systems and processes can deliver to this sector and others in reducing risk. Robin Pinning from the Hartree Centre, part of the Science and Technology Facilities Council, noted the need for culture change in understanding and in recognising the value of data, along with a drive for investment. One further topic, data security, is also at the forefront of everyone’s minds and CReDo is working towards establishing the framework to cover technical, legal, procedural and security concerns and applying federated access protocols. ‘Data and information are going to be key in mitigating climate change. Bringing that data together in digital twins is going to propel us to enhance resilience,’ Gavin Shaddick, Joint Centre for Excellence in Environmental Intelligence The expectation is that CReDo will be scalable to other networks, contexts and locations. Gavin spoke live from COP26, having seen at the conference a real understanding that data sharing in order to inform a bigger picture view is an important theme in developing resilience, adaptation and the pathway to Net Zero. There is no doubt that there will be technical challenges but desire for cross-sector collaboration for data sharing is growing fast. Gavin told the webinar, ‘Work that is going into CReDo on data interoperability and information management is directly transferable and this will make connecting digital twins much easier, both from the technological point of view and the learning in the non-technical aspects including data sharing agreements, how these are formulated and how to involve people in wide interdisciplinary groups’. Robert Pinning supports this view and believes that the project will translate easily to industry and the public sector, acting to speed up adoption of new projects and use cases. ‘There is a need to develop more use cases like CReDo to show the value that can be derived from digital twins,’ Tamar Loach, Technology Initiative Director, Connected Places Catapult. Ultimately, demonstrating the value will be down to collaborative effort across academia and industry, public and private sectors, within regions and nations, and globally. As this climate resilience project and similar use cases for connected digital twins catalyse action and enable change, then as a society we will be better positioned to adapt and respond to the challenges that face us. The CReDo team at the National Digital Twin programme would like to thank Simon Evans, the invited panel and the webinar guests for their valuable contributions at this event. For more information, contact Rachel Judson, credo@cdbb.cam.ac.uk Watch the webinar recording: View the CReDo film and try the app
  14. Visual intelligence is the ability to capture, connect and communicate information about spaces in real time. Then to instantly transform it through visualisation techniques into accurate, accessible, actionable data useable by anyone that needs. A process embedded in the simple digital twin but enabled by emerging technologies, specifically the digital integration between devices, enhanced by immersive technology and artificial intelligence. Think of visual intelligence as a compass. Without it, a vessel can’t make the most of its assets, is uncertain where it’s headed, how it will be impacted by the environment and how it can reach its destination with maximum efficiency and care for its crew. Businesses have to take certain actions to increase ROI, communicate to and manage disparate teams, automate with confidence, set out clear directions and grow faster. Connected and integrated data translated into visual intelligence enables these actions. It is the compass. Attached are some insight from a few companies who started with a simple digital twin – a connection of data – but who have embraced visual intelligence and what it means for them National Digital Twin presentation (1.1).pdf
  15. until
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) project from the National Digital Twin programme is holding a webinar to launch the project to a global audience in conjunction with the COP26 climate conference on 2nd November at 10:30-12. This webinar replaces the weekly Gemini Call, and the DT Hub community are encouraged to sign up, as well as inviting their wider networks to attend. The climate emergency is here now, and connected digital twins are an important part of achieving net zero and climate resilience. The CReDo team will present how the project meets this urgent need, and will premiere two exciting outputs – a short film and an interactive visualisation of how connected data across three infrastructure networks can provide better insights and lead to better resilience of the system-of-systems overall. Only if we come together to securely share data across sectors can we plan a smarter, greener, more resilient built environment. Book your spot today! Keep an eye on the DT Hub website for updates about the CReDo programme.
  16. RachelJudson

    Planning Golden Thread

    Click here for video As citizens and professionals we accept that the planning process is there to uphold standards of safety, aesthetic, technical and social requirements. However, the planning process has suffered from many years of tinkering and making good. We now have a planning process that is dependent on outdated approaches and incompatible with the rest of the development industry. It is slow, which presents problems in the UK where we need to build, a lot, quickly. Planning risks preventing this building from happening at pace and of a higher quality. This situation presents, of course, a golden opportunity for a fully digitised end-to-end process which could: reduce the planning bottleneck automate those parts of the process that can be Increase transparency of the process open up new means of engaging stakeholders with the planning process, by for example visualising proposed developments and so increasing understanding allow us to see projects in context, with other proposed developments, rather than in isolation allow access to, and sharing of, crucial data (like structural and fire safety information) facilitate the use of modern methods of construction most importantly, give a more accurate understanding of build costs and timescales In order to bring this about, we have to standardise and digitise (as far as it is possible and desirable) the rules under which designs are created, assessed, and ultimately built. At the same time we have to find ways to generate and use interoperable data. This problem is what the group from Bryden Wood, 3D Repo, London Borough of Southwark and CDBB have been working on. We have developed a model which is open and based on the established BIM Collaboration Framework (BCF). It presents the data associated with planning so that it can be queried and interrogated. You can see a summary in the video above and read more about it here; Planning Golden Thread statement attached below 3DRepo technical write up Bryden Wood technical write up Bryden Wood Schema We know that many of the barriers associated with a change like this will be cultural rather than technical so we are seeking partners in the planning and development system who would like to test the model and collaborators who would like to fund the next stage of development. Please get in touch! You can also hear more about this on the Gemini Call on Tuesday, 18 May at 10:30 with Miranda Sharp and Jack Ricketts of Southwark Council. Link to DT Hub Calendar
  17. The building stock is a city’s most significant socio-cultural and economic resource and its largest capital asset. Buildings are also where we spend most of our lives and most of our money, and where enormous potential for energy and waste reduction lies. To help improve the quality, sustainability and resilience of building stocks, and to help reduce emissions from them, comprehensive information on their composition, operation and dynamic behaviour are required. However in many countries relevant data are extremely difficult to obtain, often highly fragmented, restricted, missing or only available in aggregated form. Colouring Cities sets out to address this issue. The initiative develops open code to facilitate the construction and management of low cost public databases, which double as knowledge exchange platforms, providing open data on buildings, at building level. These are provided to answer questions such as: How many buildings do we have? Which building types, uses, construction systems, ages, styles and sizes are located where? How repairable, adaptable and extendable are they? How long can they last if properly maintained? How energy efficient are they? Can they easily be retrofitted? Who built them and what is their ownership type, and how well do local communities think they work? Colouring Cities also looks to advance a more efficient, whole-of-society approach to knowledge sharing on buildings and cities, allowing for permanent databases to be collaboratively maintained and enriched, year-on-year, by citizens, academia, government, industry and the voluntary sector. Colouring London https://colouringlondon.org/, our live prototype, has been built and tested over the past five years using a step-by-step collaborative approach which has involved consultation with academia, government, industry, the voluntary sector and the community (working across science, the humanities and the arts). It looks to test four approaches to data provision-collation of existing open uploads, computational generation, local crowdsourcing and live streaming. In 2020 the Colouring Cities Research Programme was set up at The Alan Turing Institute to support international research institutions wishing to reproduce and co-work on Colouring Cities code at city or country level. We are currently collaborating with academic partners in Lebanon, Bahrain, Australia, Germany and Greece and Switzerland. Watch the Hub Insight to learn more about the project and the opportunity to get involved. If you'd like to get involved please do test our site and add any recommendations for features you would like in our discussion thread https://discuss.colouring.london/. Or, if you are a public body or DTHub industry member wishing to increase open access to your infrastructure datasets, and/or to digital twin visualisations, relating to the building stock, please contact Polly Hudson at Turing. Find out more:
  18. The pandemic has highlighted the need to make better, data-driven decisions that are focused on creating better outcomes. It has shown how digital technologies and the data that drives them are key to putting the right information in the right hands at the right time to ensure that we make the right decision to achieve the right outcomes. Connected ecosystems of digital twins, part of the cyber physical fabric, will allow us to share data across sectors, in a secure and resilient fashion, to ensure that we can make those important decisions for the outcomes that we need. They provide us with a transformative tool to tackle the major issues of our time, such as climate change, global healthcare and food inequality. We must use digital twins for the public good, as set out in “Data for the Public Good”, and we must also use those digital twins to create a better future for people and the planet. The recent publication of the Vision for the Built Environment sets out a pioneering vision for the built environment, and we want to see that vision expanded further, to include other sectors, such as health, education, manufacturing and agriculture. As the UK considers what a national digital twin might look like, we draw on the experience of the past three years to add to the discussion. A UK national digital twin must have a purpose-built delivery vehicle that works through coordination, alignment and collaboration. It needs to bring together those working in the field, across sectors, across industries, and across government departments. It must balance the need for research, both within academic institutions and industry, with the industry implementation and adoption that is already underway. And it must ensure that the programme is socio-technical in nature; if we concentrate solely on the technical factors, while failing to address the equally important social considerations, we risk creating a solution that cannot or will not be adopted – a beautiful, shiny, perfect piece of ‘tech’ that sits on a shelf gathering dust. There are many in the UK doing fantastic work in the digital twin space, and the wider cyber-physical fabric of which connected digital twins are a part. We know from experience that we get much better outcomes when we work together as a diverse team, rather than in siloes which lead to fragmentation. Industry is already creating digital twins and connecting them to form ecosystems. If we are to avoid divergence, we have to act now. To start the discussion and allow the sharing of thoughts and experience, the Royal Academy of Engineering has convened an open summit, hosted by the DT Hub on the 19th July from 10:00 – 16:00. The day will start with an introduction laying out the opportunities and challenges we face as a nation and as a planet. This will be followed by four expert-led panels, each with a Q&A session. The first is chaired by Paul Clarke CBE on the cyber physical fabric; followed by a panel on data and technical interoperability chaired by Professor Dame Wendy Hall; after lunch, Professor David Lane CBE will chair a panel on research; followed by a panel on adoption chaired by Mark Enzer OBE. The four panel chairs will convene a final plenary session. I do hope you will join us, to hear the experiences of others and to add your own expertise and knowledge to the conversation. To register for the Summit, click here.
  19. Dave Murray

    Test Engineering and DTs

    I am considering starting a network for topics related to Lifecycle V&V (Validation and Verification) centred on Evaluation and Testing, and this message is to poll the level of potential interest. I imagine the network would offer the following: · A place for Test Engineers from different market sectors to share experiences and gain knowledge · Support for those areas where DT activity is low but growing, the Defence Sector is an example, to benefit from the experiences of other sectors Test Engineers have a mix of technical and customer skills that are central to successful project implementation. The DT concept provides a lifecycle project-thread that provides Test Engineers with an unprecedented opportunity to exercise their skills. Maybe finding a way to maximise this opportunity might also attract more people to the career, and be a way to improve recruitment into the world of Engineering? If we launch this Network, would you consider joining it? Dave Murray
  20. until
    Speaker: Mark Enzer, CDBB and CTO, Mott MacDonald The National Digital Twin (NDT) is a huge idea using “data for the public good” at its heart. The NDT promises enormous value for the people of the UK, both in the delivery of new assets and in the performance of our existing infrastructure. The fundamental premise behind the NDT is: Better data + Better Analysis => Better Decisions => Better outcomes for people and society – which is the essential promise of the Information Age. The NDT is not envisaged as one massive model of everything, but as an ecosystem of connected digital twins. Connecting digital twins requires interoperability to enable secure resilient data to be shared across organisational and sector boundaries. However, interoperability requires a level of data quality and consistency that “the market” cannot achieve on its own; it requires government-level leadership to create the right conditions for “the market” to adopt and deliver to the standards required and in doing so develop and thrive. This presentation will: introduce the National Digital Twin, explain what it is and why we need it, and outline what is being done to deliver it. Register at the link below for Mark's presentation and others: Webinar: DMSG & DAMA collaboration event: Making data good for society | BCS
  21. https://gateway.newton.ac.uk/event/tgmw80 This one day workshop presents an opportunity to get up-to-date on the state of the art with 4-dimensionalism and its application. It is a joint collaboration between the Newton Gateway to Mathematics, GCHQ, UCL STEaPP, Southampton University, Warwick University and Brunel University. Current and potential applications of 4D/Digital Twin data modelling are wide ranging. In recent decades it has been used in both Oil and Gas and Defence/Security environments. Potential uses include the built environment and various engineering applications including aircraft engines, wind turbines, buildings and large structures, control systems. The Grenfell tragedy and subsequent enquiry has uncovered the failure to use information effectively by a complex ecosystem of organisations. At the same time the challenges posed by responding to Covid has resulted in the Royal Society DELVE group to state clearly that there is a lot to learn from the current shortcomings in the use of data. The integrated use of data to inform key decisions offers a lot of potential. However, integration of data turns out to be far harder than is generally assumed. This event will cover what it takes to address data integration and illustrate its grounding in both pure mathematics and philosophy. A programme of talks will outline recent advances in the 4-dimensional ecosystem, and how they are being taken up and applied within the National Digital Twin programme. This event should be of interest to Data Architects from multiple settings including, industry, business and the public sector. 4-Dimensionalism in large scale data sharing and integration will also have broad appeal to the mathematical sciences as it draws upon a surprising number of branches of pure mathematics disciplines in the construction of a formal model basis for data integration. It should be applicable to a wide range of applied mathematics fields, where the use of models and data to increasingly complex areas is vital, and supports improved and trusted human-centred decision making. Presentations will touch on set theory, topology, geometry, combinatorics and formal logic and explain why the need for consistency in data depends on harnessing them. A Provisional Programme is available here. Registration and Venue To register and for further information, please follow the registration link in the left hand panel. The workshop will be hosted virtually by the Newton Gateway to Mathematics and the joining instructions will be circulated prior to the event.
  22. David McK

    The value of, and from, Data

    For me, Digital Twins are for acquiring, maintaining and exploiting Data - as a means to an end. We need to shift the typical focus of many organisations away from technology and "IT" towards understanding this perspective. I think the real value comes from thinking about Data Flows and not just the Data (store / Lake / whatever). This is my perspective also in the context of Asset Management. I am not associated with Anmut, but I recommend this well-written Report. (They have collaborated with Highways England to do some extremely exciting and useful work re Gemini.) https://anmut.co.uk/insights/ https://www.linkedin.com/posts/guyjdavis96_data-research-datavalue-activity-6739116308098514944-l4Vo
  23. (8) Data wrangling - importing 300+ datasets a quarter - YouTube Is this making the case for bread and butter digital transformation?
  24. Hi IMF Community, You may find this workshop interesting: "4-Dimensionalism in Large Scale Data Sharing and Integration" Full details and Registration can be found at: https://gateway.newton.ac.uk/event/tgmw80 . The workshop will feature six presentations on state-of-the–art research from experts on 4-Dimensionalism in large scale data sharing and integration followed by a chaired Presenter's Panel. Each presentation will cover aspects of 4-Dimensionalism from the basics to Top Level Ontologies and Co-Constructional Ontology with each answering the question posed by the previous presentation.
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