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  1. The bigger and more complicated the engineering problem, the more likely it is to have a digital twin. Firms that build rockets, planes and ships, for example, have been creating digital twins since the early 2000s, seeing significant operational efficiencies and cost-savings as a result. To date, however, few firms have been able to realise the full potential of this technology by using it to develop new value- added services for their customers. We have developed a framework designed to help scale the value of digital twins beyond operational efficiency towards new revenue streams. In spite of the hype surrounding digital twins, there is little guidance for executives to help them make sense of the business opportunities the technology presents, beyond cost savings and operational efficiencies. Many businesses are keen to get a greater return on their digital twins’ investment by capitalising on the innovation – and revenue generating - opportunities that may arise from a deeper understanding of how customers use their products. However, because very few firms are making significant progress in this regard, there is no blueprint to follow. New business models are evolving but the business opportunities for suppliers, technology partners and end-users is yet to be fully documented. Most businesses will be familiar with the business model canvas as a tool to identify current and future business model opportunities. Our ‘Four Values’ (4Vs) framework for digital twins is a more concise version of the tool, developed to help executives better understand potential new business models. It was designed from a literature review and validated and modified through industry interviews. The 4Vs framework covers: the value proposition for the product or service being offered, the value architecture or the infrastructure that the firm creates and maintains in order to generate sustainable revenues; the value network representing the firm’s infrastructure and network of partners needed to create value and to maintain good customer relationships; and value finance such as cost and revenue structures. Value proposition The value proposition describes how an organisation creates value for itself, its customers and other stakeholders such as supply chain partners. It defines the products and services offered, customer value (both for customers and other businesses) as well as the ownership structure. Examples of digital twin-based services include condition monitoring, visualization, analytics, data selling, training, data aggregation and lifespan extension. Examples of customer value in this context might include: decision support, personalisation, process optimisation and transparency, customer/operator experience and training. Value architecture The value architecture describes how the business model is structured. It has 5 elements: 1. Value control is the approach an organisation takes to control value in the ecosystem. For example, does it exist solely within its own ecosystem of digital twin services or does it intersect with other ecosystems? 2. Value delivery describes how the digital twins are delivered, are they centralised, decentralised or hybrid? It also seeks to understand any barriers that may prevent the delivery of digital twins to customers. 3. Interactions refers to the method of customer interaction with the digital twin. Common examples of interaction include desktop or mobile app, virtual reality and augmented reality interactions. 4. Data collection underlies the digital twin value proposition and can be a combination of the following: sensor based and/or supplied/purchased data. 5. Boundary resources are the resources made available to enhance network effects and scale of digital twin services. This typically comprises of the following: APIs, hackathons, software development toolkits and forums. Value network The value network is the understanding of interorganisational connections and collaborations between a network of parties, organisations and stakeholders. In the context of digital twin services, this is a given as the delivery mechanism relies on multiple organisations, technological infrastructure and stakeholders. Value finance This defines how organisations approach costing, pricing methods and revenue structure for digital twins. Digital twin revenue model most commonly refers to outcomes-based revenue streams and data-driven revenue models. Digital twin pricing models include, for example, freemium and premium, subscription models, value-based pricing and outcome-based pricing models. Four types of digital twin business models were identified from extensive interviews with middle and top management on services offered by digital twins, we identified four different types of business models and applied our 4Vs approach to understand how those models are configured and how they generate value. Brokers These were all found in information, data and system services industries. Their value proposition is to provide a data marketplace that orchestrates the different players in the ecosystem and provides anonymised performance data from, for example, vehicle engines or heating systems for buildings. Value Finance consists of recurring monthly revenues levied through a platform which itself takes a fee and allocates the rest according to the partnership arrangements. Maintenance-optimisers This business model is prevalent in the world of complex assets, such as chemical processing plants and buildings. Its value proposition lies in providing additional insights to the customer on the maintenance of their assets to provide just-in-time services. What-if analysis and scenario planning are used to augment the services provided with the physical asset that is sold. Its Value Architecture is both open and closed, as these firms play in ecosystems but also create their own. They control the supply chain, how they design the asset, how they test it and deliver it. Its Value Network consists of strategic partners in process modelling, 3D visualisation, CAD, infrastructure and telecommunications. Value Finance includes software and services which provide a good margin within a subscription model. Clients are more likely to take add-on services that show significant cost savings. Uptime assurers This business model tends to be found in the transport sector, where it’s important to maximise the uptime of the aircraft, train or vehicle. The value proposition centres on keeping these vehicles operational, either through predictive maintenance for vehicle/ aircraft fleet management and, in the case of HGVs, route optimisation. Its Value Architecture is transitioning from closed to open ecosystems. There are fewer lock- in solutions as customers increasingly want an ecosystems approach. Typically, it is distributors, head offices and workshops that interact with the digital twin rather than the end-customer. The Value Network is open at the design and assembly lifecycle stages but becomes closed during sustainment phases. For direct customers digital twins are built in-house and are therefore less reliant on third-party solutions. Its Value Finance is focused on customers paying a fee to maximise the uptime of the vehicle or aircraft, guaranteeing, for example, access five days a week between certain hours. Mission assurers This business model focuses on delivering the necessary outcome to the customers. It tends to be found with government clients in the defense and aerospace sector. Value propositions are centered around improving efficacy of support and maintenance/ operator insight and guaranteeing mission success or completion. These business models suffer from a complex landscape of ownership for integrators of systems as much of the data does not make it to sustainment stages. Its Value Architecture is designed to deliver a series of digital threads in a decentralised manner. Immersive technologies are used for training purposes or improved operator experience. Its Value Network is more closed than open as these industries focus on critical missions of highly secure assets. Therefore, service providers are more security minded and careful of relying on third-party platforms for digital twin services. Semi-open architecture is used to connect to different hierarchies of digital twins/digital threads. Value Finance revealed that existing pricing models, contracts and commercial models are not yet necessarily mature enough to transition into platform-based revenue models. Insights as a service is a future direction but challenging at the moment, with the market not yet mature for outcome-based pricing. For B2B service-providers who are looking to generate new revenue from their digital twins, it is important to consider how the business model should be configured and identify major barriers to their success. Our research found that the barriers most often cited were cost, cybersecurity, cultural acceptance of the technology, commercial or market needs and, perhaps most significantly, a lack of buy-in from business leaders. Our 4Vs framework has been designed to help those leaders arrive at a better understanding of the business opportunities digital twin services can provide. We hope this will drive innovation and help digital twins realise their full business potential. Now for a small request to the reader that has reached this far, we are looking to scale these research findings in our mass survey across industry on the business models of digital twins. If your organisation is planning to implement or has already started its journey of transformation with digital twins please help support our study by participating in our survey. Survey remains fully anonymised and all our findings will be shared with the DTHub community in an executive summary by the end of the year. Link to participate in the survey study https://cambridge.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0PXRkrDsXwtCnXg
  2. PRESS RELEASE With the announcement that the Digital Twin Hub will transition to an Industry/Catapult partnership housed at the Connected Places Catapult (CPC), we are pleased to add that the next phase of the National Digital Twin programme’s Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) will also move to CPC. This next phase will build on the excellent efforts of the interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral team who worked on CReDo so far. This work is being shared openly to contribute to a culture of secure data sharing for the purposes of resilience and adaptation to climate change. The first phase of CReDo, showing the benefits of connected digital twins across infrastructure networks on adaptation and resilience, is coming to a close at the end of March. This phase of the project, funded by UK Research and Innovation, the University of Cambridge and CPC, wrapped up with a public webinar on 2nd March 2022, which was attended by over 240 participants and featured insights from the technical development team, funders and asset owners. So far, CReDo has demonstrated how collaboration through connected digital twins is key to tackling climate change. The project is marking the move into its next phase at CPC with a series of outputs that will share key findings, benefits, lessons learned and the technical approach to this first-of-its-kind collaboration. These are all openly available on the Digital Twin Hub from today. Discussing the urgency for collaboration through connected digital twins, Sarah Hayes, Head of the CReDo project, said: “The risks arising from failing to adapt to climate change are huge. CReDo seeks to mitigate these risks by increasing our understanding of infrastructure interdependencies and the future impact of interventions to increase resilience. The CReDo team have worked incredibly hard to lay the foundations for increasing infrastructure system resilience. It is the skills of our people, supported by new technologies, which will take forward our capability to tackle climate change through connected digital twins.” Pointing to the potential for this work to have a positive impact, Mark Enzer, Head of the National Digital Twin programme, said: “In a wonderfully tangible and relevant way, CReDo has shown the value of enabling secure information flow across sector boundaries. But this should be just the beginning. The idea of connecting digital twins must be extended to other sectors and other use cases – not only in addressing climate change, but wherever we need to understand systems better and intervene more effectively. I believe in CReDo!” Looking forward to the next phase of the project, Yalena Coleman, Director of Applied Data & Technology at CPC, said, “Integrated infrastructure is a key strategic focus area for Connected Places Catapult, and we will be investing in further phases of CReDo, working together with partners to take forward the key learnings from this phase. We will ensure the learnings are shared with the wider community and across other relevant initiatives like the Digital Connectivity Infrastructure Accelerator, National Underground Asset Register and others; and link up industry, academia and government thinking in this area.”
  3. Marek Suchocki

    Flexible Digital Twins

    A digital twin is a digital representation of something that exists in the physical world (be it a building, a factory, a power plant, or a city) and, in addition, can be dynamically linked to the real thing through the use of sensors that collect real-time data. This dynamic link to the real thing differentiates digital twins from the digital models created by BIM software—enhancing those models with live operational data. Since a digital twin is a dynamic digital reflection of its physical self, it possesses operational and behavioral awareness. This enables the digital twin to be used in countless ways, such as tracking construction progress, monitoring operations, diagnosing problems, simulating performance, and optimizing processes. Structured data requirements from the investor are crucial for the development of a digital twin. Currently project teams spend a lot of time putting data into files that unfortunately isn’t useful during the project development or ultimately to the owner; sometimes it is wrong, at other times too little, or in other cases an overload of unnecessary data. At the handover phase, unstructured data can leave owner/operators with siloed data and systems, inaccurate information, and poor insight into the performance of a facility. Data standards such as ISO 19650 directly target this problem that at a simple level require an appreciation of the asset data lifecycle that starts with defining the need in order to allow for correct data preparation. Implementing a project CDE helps ensure that the prepared data and information is managed and flows easily between various teams and project phases, through to completion and handover. An integrated connected data environment can subsequently leverage this approved project data alongside other asset information sources to deliver the foundation of a valuable useable digital twin. To develop this connected digital twin, investors and their supply chains can appear to be presented with two choices: an off-the-shelf proprietary solution tied to one vendor or the prospect of building a one-off solution with risk of long term support and maintenance challenges. However, this binary perspective is not the case if industry platforms and readily available existing integrations are leveraged to create a flexible custom digital twin. Autodesk has provided its customer base with the solutions to develop custom data integrations over many years, commencing with a reliable common data environment solution. Many of these project CDEs have subsequently migrated to become functional and beneficial digital twins because of a structured data foundation. Using industry standards, open APIs and a plethora of partner integrations, Autodesk’s Forge Platform, Construction Cloud and recently Tandem enable customers to build the digital twin they need without fear of near term obsolescence or over commitment to one technology approach. Furthermore partnerships with key technology providers such as ESRI and Archibus extend solution options as well as enhancing long term confidence in any developed digital twin. The promises of digital twins are certainly alluring. Data-rich digital twins have the potential to transform asset management and operations, providing owners new insights to inform their decision-making and planning. Although digital twin technologies and industry practice are still in their youth, it is clear that the ultimate success of digital twins relies on connected, common, and structured data sources based on current information management standards, coupled with adoption of flexible technology platforms that permit modification, enhancement or component exchange as the digital twin evolves, instead of committing up front to one data standard or solution strategy.
  4. The Cyber-Physical Infrastructure Vision was launched on the 11th February 2022 on the DT Hub. Watch the webinar and read the vision. Humanity faces pressing planetary scale challenges including the climate emergency, resilience to unexpected shocks, consumption, security, healthcare, food, and many others. The UK punches above its weight but we are competing with other countries with more data, more resources, more money and sometimes political advantages too. So as a nation we need to find new ways to create leverage and defensible competitive advantage. To respond to these challenges and opportunities, we need to reframe the concept of infrastructure. This is not just buildings, roads, railways and fibre broadband to rural communities, it is also the enabling cyber-physical infrastructure that is often overlooked. Big vertical initiatives and missions lack the time, budget, capabilities and often the vision to build this infrastructure for themselves, let alone to support other initiatives. Companies like Ocado, Rolls-Royce, Arup and Mott MacDonald are successful demonstrators of the transformative power of this cyber-physical infrastructure but they are the exceptions that we now need to make the norm. So a growing coalition of the willing, led by the Robotics Growth Partnership have been engaging with the government and other stakeholders on a vision for a national Cyber-Physical Infrastructure. Harnessing the power of technologies such as data, Internet of Things, synthetic environments, digital twins, smart machines and living labs, in combination with the tools, infrastructure and recipes that will enable us to work smarter, faster, with less risk and at lower cost. The vision for this Cyber-Physical Infrastructure was published on 11 February 2022 and is available on the gov.uk website via the following link.
  5. By 2050, an estimated 4.1 million people will be affected by sight loss in the UK, making up a portion of the 14.1 million disabled people in the UK. How might digital twins create opportunities for better accessibility and navigability of the built environment for blind and partially sighted people? A new infographic presents a conception of how this might work in the future. In their work with the Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, the Smart Hospitals of the Future research team have explored how user-focused services based on connected digital twins might work. Starting from a user perspective, the team have investigated ways in which digital technology can support better services, and their ideas for a more accessible, seamless experience are captured in a new infographic. In the infographic, service user Suhani accesses assistive technology for blind people on her mobile phone to navigate her journey to an appointment at an eye hospital. On the way, she is aided by interoperable, live data from various digital twins that seamlessly respond to changing circumstances. The digital twins are undetectable to Suhani, but nevertheless they help her meet her goal of safely and comfortably getting to her appointment. They also help her doctors meet their goals of giving Suhani the best care possible. The doctors at the eye hospital are relying on a wider ecosystem of digital twins beyond their own building digital twin to make sure this happens, as Suhani’s successful journey to the hospital is vital to ensuring they can provide her with care. Physical assets, such as buildings and transport networks, are not the only things represented in this hypothetical ecosystem of connected digital twins. A vital component pictured here are digital twins of patients based on their medical data, and the team brings up questions about the social acceptability and security of digital twins of people, particularly vulnerable people. No community is a monolith, and disabled communities are no exception. The research team acknowledges that more research is needed with the user community of Moorfields to understand the variety of needs across the service pathway that digital twins could support. As such, developers need to consider the range of users with different abilities and work with those users to design a truly inclusive ecosystem of digital twins. The work by the Smart Hospitals research team raises wider questions about the role of digital technology both in creating more physical accessibility in the built environment but also potentially creating more barriers to digital accessibility. It is not enough to create assistive technologies if not everyone can – or wants to – have access to those technologies. ‘The role of digital technologies in exacerbating potentially digital inequalities is something that needs to be looked at from a policy perspective, both at the hospital level, but also more generally, from a government Department of Health perspective,’ says Dr Michael Barrett, the project’s principal investigator. Dr Karl Prince, co-investigator, reflects that, ‘The traditional questions when it comes to this type of technology are raised as to: do they have access to equipment, and do they have the technical ability?’ The lesson is that you can build digital twins that create a better experience for people if you design digital systems from the perspective of an ecosystems of services, with input from users of that ecosystem. Through exciting case studies, the project raises vital questions about digital ethics and the potentially transformative effects of digital twins on the physical built environment. To read the infographic in detail, click here. You can read more from the Smart Hospitals project by visiting their research profile page. This research forms part of the Centre for Digital Built Britain’s (CDBB) work at the University of Cambridge. It was enabled by the Construction Innovation Hub, of which CDBB is a core partner, and funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF). To join the conversation with others who are on their own digital twin journeys, join the Digital Twin Hub.
  6. Ali Nicholl and Sophie Peachey (IOTICS) present a Feature Focus on Cooperative Ecosystems - Evolution of Trust
  7. Digital twins can help organisations achieve various goals. In some cases, the end goal is for buildings and infrastructure to last longer, use less energy, and be safer. In others, it is enhancing the lives of people who interact with the built environment and its services. As highlighted by the Gemini Principles, these are not mutually exclusive aims, so wherever you are on your digital twin journey, it is important to consider other perspectives on the hybrid digital and physical systems you create. How will your digital twin fit into a wider ecosystem that provides services to all kinds of people? How will your asset’s performance impact the wider built environment and those who need to navigate it? Whose lives will be better if you share data securely and purposefully. In the first output from the Digital Twin Journeys series, the team working on the Smart Hospital of the Future research project, enabled by the Construction Innovation Hub, shared case studies from two smart hospitals and reflect on the innovations they saw during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this two video mini-series, the research team shares insights about how existing digital maturity enabled these hospitals to respond to the pandemic in agile ways, transforming to a hybrid physical and digital model of care distributed across multiple sites. They also explored how individual asset digital twins fit into a wider landscape of ecosystem services, guiding how we approach interoperability to achieve better outcomes. These insights inform the way we think about the role of digital twins in the smart built environments of the future. Dr Nirit Pilosof reflects that, ‘Digital twin as a concept can promote the design of the new system, the design process of the built environment and the technologies, but also really help operate… the hybrid models looking at the physical and virtual environments together.’ If health care is enabled by connected digital twins, how could the design of hospitals – and whole cities – change? In the videos, the team also discusses the limitations and ethics of services enabled by digital data and the use of digital technologies to improve staff safety, from isolated COVID wards to telemedicine. They frame service innovation as an iterative and collaborative process, informed by the needs of digital twin users, whether those are the asset owners and operators, or the people benefitting from the services they provide. According to project co-lead Dr Michael Barrett, ‘The people who need to drive the change are the people who are providing the service.' After the COVID crisis, we can better recognise what we have learned from implementing digital services at scale, as more people than ever have relied on them. The team reflect that having the right people in the right roles enabled the smart hospitals in these cases to transform their services rapidly in response to the need. The same human and organisational infrastructure that is creating the smart hospital of the future is also needed to create the flexible, responsive built environments of the future. Digital Twin Journeys can start from the perspective of available technology, from a problem-solving perspective, or from the perspective of users experiencing a service ecosystem. The smart hospitals project demonstrates the value of the latter two approaches. Hospital staff were instrumental in shaping the digitally-enabled service innovation to keep them safe and offer better services on and offsite, but project co-lead Dr Karl Prince points out how people accessing those services have to navigate a variety of different services in the built environment to get there. As we begin to connect digital twins together, we need to consider not just our own needs but the needs of others that digital twins can address. For more on this project, including links to their publications, see the team’s research profile on the CDBB website. Keep up with the Digital Twin Journeys series on the CDBB website or here on the Digital Twin Hub blog.
  8. until
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) project from the National Digital Twin programme is holding a webinar to launch the project to a global audience in conjunction with the COP26 climate conference on 2nd November at 10:30-12. This webinar replaces the weekly Gemini Call, and the DT Hub community are encouraged to sign up, as well as inviting their wider networks to attend. The climate emergency is here now, and connected digital twins are an important part of achieving net zero and climate resilience. The CReDo team will present how the project meets this urgent need, and will premiere two exciting outputs – a short film and an interactive visualisation of how connected data across three infrastructure networks can provide better insights and lead to better resilience of the system-of-systems overall. Only if we come together to securely share data across sectors can we plan a smarter, greener, more resilient built environment. Book your spot today! Keep an eye on the DT Hub website for updates about the CReDo programme.
  9. Hi Everyone, I am looking for an 6 month-1 year internship on Digital twins, Regards, AJ +97433193766 Whatsapp
  10. I came across an EU funded project "xr4all" which provides a development environment(among other things) for XR projects. The details are here: https://dev.xr4all.eu Will it be possible for the NDT programme to provide similar platform for DT community in the UK? It will help in fostering rapid collaboration and development of the DT ecosystem. Thanks and kind regards, Ajeeth
  11. The pandemic has highlighted the need to make better, data-driven decisions that are focused on creating better outcomes. It has shown how digital technologies and the data that drives them are key to putting the right information in the right hands at the right time to ensure that we make the right decision to achieve the right outcomes. Connected ecosystems of digital twins, part of the cyber physical fabric, will allow us to share data across sectors, in a secure and resilient fashion, to ensure that we can make those important decisions for the outcomes that we need. They provide us with a transformative tool to tackle the major issues of our time, such as climate change, global healthcare and food inequality. We must use digital twins for the public good, as set out in “Data for the Public Good”, and we must also use those digital twins to create a better future for people and the planet. The recent publication of the Vision for the Built Environment sets out a pioneering vision for the built environment, and we want to see that vision expanded further, to include other sectors, such as health, education, manufacturing and agriculture. As the UK considers what a national digital twin might look like, we draw on the experience of the past three years to add to the discussion. A UK national digital twin must have a purpose-built delivery vehicle that works through coordination, alignment and collaboration. It needs to bring together those working in the field, across sectors, across industries, and across government departments. It must balance the need for research, both within academic institutions and industry, with the industry implementation and adoption that is already underway. And it must ensure that the programme is socio-technical in nature; if we concentrate solely on the technical factors, while failing to address the equally important social considerations, we risk creating a solution that cannot or will not be adopted – a beautiful, shiny, perfect piece of ‘tech’ that sits on a shelf gathering dust. There are many in the UK doing fantastic work in the digital twin space, and the wider cyber-physical fabric of which connected digital twins are a part. We know from experience that we get much better outcomes when we work together as a diverse team, rather than in siloes which lead to fragmentation. Industry is already creating digital twins and connecting them to form ecosystems. If we are to avoid divergence, we have to act now. To start the discussion and allow the sharing of thoughts and experience, the Royal Academy of Engineering has convened an open summit, hosted by the DT Hub on the 19th July from 10:00 – 16:00. The day will start with an introduction laying out the opportunities and challenges we face as a nation and as a planet. This will be followed by four expert-led panels, each with a Q&A session. The first is chaired by Paul Clarke CBE on the cyber physical fabric; followed by a panel on data and technical interoperability chaired by Professor Dame Wendy Hall; after lunch, Professor David Lane CBE will chair a panel on research; followed by a panel on adoption chaired by Mark Enzer OBE. The four panel chairs will convene a final plenary session. I do hope you will join us, to hear the experiences of others and to add your own expertise and knowledge to the conversation. To register for the Summit, click here.
  12. Dave Murray

    Test Engineering and DTs

    I am considering starting a network for topics related to Lifecycle V&V (Validation and Verification) centred on Evaluation and Testing, and this message is to poll the level of potential interest. I imagine the network would offer the following: · A place for Test Engineers from different market sectors to share experiences and gain knowledge · Support for those areas where DT activity is low but growing, the Defence Sector is an example, to benefit from the experiences of other sectors Test Engineers have a mix of technical and customer skills that are central to successful project implementation. The DT concept provides a lifecycle project-thread that provides Test Engineers with an unprecedented opportunity to exercise their skills. Maybe finding a way to maximise this opportunity might also attract more people to the career, and be a way to improve recruitment into the world of Engineering? If we launch this Network, would you consider joining it? Dave Murray
  13. Humanner project looking for R&D Partners Digital Twin for co-creators of the innovative social solutions It is time to align people and environmental needs through new interconnected collaborative organizational models. Establish the bridge between the virtual and offline world as well as connect academics and communities to focus on social impact by providing the missing valuable functions of the social technology for the common good. We want everyone to be able to share and take joint action on everyday experiences and quality of life concerns; at a local, national and global level. Humans are keystone species in whatever environment they inhabit. - We have known as human beings that our planet is small, fragile and interconnected. Citizen Social Science in the age of the ALPHA GENERATION To do this by holistically connect the disconnected and isolated dots with each other and communities of GLOCAL society to use technologies and methods to collectively solve problems by holistic approach and Eco-System Design thinking to improve the.. Humanity’s relationship to its environment Humanity’s relationship to technology, and Humanity’s relationship to itself The vision of the Humanner is - ‘To progress our society, economy and environment through collective innovation.’ THE PROBLEM IS NOT THE LACK OF A COLLECTIVE DESIRE FOR A POSITIVE FUTURE BUT THE LACK OF A COLLECTIVE VEHICLE FOR POSITIVE ACTIONS. How Can Technology Accelerate Social Evolution? Digital collective intelligence We sorely lack more concerted support and action to assemble new combinations of tools that can help the society think and act at a pace as well as scale commensurate with the problems we face. We need an entirely different model of dealing with reality, a new frame of mind, a collective intelligence. This is an ability to come into communion with a group and act as a single unit of intelligence. Multi Layered Collaborative Semantic Social Network for collective social innovation ecosystem management Humanner's system work with a MULTI FUNCTIONAL holistic multisolving approach so that make the investment more impactful. Single investment of time and money - Defined as a way of solving multiple problems with multisolving approach brings together stakeholders from different sectors and disciplines to tackle public issues in a cost-efficient manner 1/ "Normal" days (GLOCAL) - Collective Social Innovation Network 2/ In Crisis situation can turn into - Collective Crisis Management System SOCIETY - ISO 37105 Descriptive Framework for Cities and Communities - provides a framework to describe the key entities within a city. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/citizen-social-science-age-alpha-generation-humanner-/
  14. Helena

    Cyber-Physical Fabric Summit

    until
    The DT Hub is proud to be the host of the Cyber-Physical Fabric Summit on 19 July 2021. 10:00 – 16:00 This online summit will explore the power of federated digital twins and cyber-physical infrastructure at a national scale, and is supported by the Royal Academy of Engineering, BEIS, UKRI, GoScience, Alan Turing Institute, Centre for Digital Built Britain and Robotics Growth Partnership. This summit will pull together stakeholders across these infrastructure landscapes. It will explore a bold, expansive vision for a cyber-physical fabric at a national scale to power prosperity and take time, cost and risk out of many vertical initiatives and moonshots. This new horizontal infrastructure would stitch together our physical and digital worlds, weaving together threads such as data, AI, synthetic environments, connected digital twins, living labs, connected smart machines and social science. It could be as transformative as the world wide web and, like the web, would be owned by nobody but used by everybody. The objective is to connect these stakeholders and hopefully foster greater understanding and alignment. If you would like to attend, please register here: Please feel free to share this event with anyone else you feel might be interested in this event.
  15. TechUK’s Digital Twins Working Group (DTWG) published a landmark report- ‘Unlocking Value Across the UK’s Digital Twin Ecosystem’- on Thursday 25th February. The purpose of this report is to drive consensus around terminology, highlight key prizes associated with digital twinning across the UK, and to set out strategic recommendations for industry and Government as to how the UK’s digital twin ecosystem can progress and evolve long-term. The report also sets out a handful of recommendations, including that there should be a cross-cutting, interdisciplinary co-ordinating body to promote their use. It would identify common information requirements and capability gaps, provide guidance on codes of conduct in the use of digital twins, and develop incentives such as tax credits or innovation funding. This would come with a 10-year public investment of £150-200 million to support innovation, adoption and diffusion, and strong roles for the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). A further boost could be provided by an online procurement portal – the cost of which is estimated at up to £1.5 million – that would make digital twin offerings on the market more visible and less complex, and lead to improvements in their quality and affordability. Other recommendations are for a series of strategic demonstrator projects to show the value and identify barriers to the adoption of digital twins; to identify the skills needed to support their use; and for UKRI to run a demonstrator project on how the concept can support the aim for net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
  16. Hi all, I understand that most members of here will be focused on DTs for the built environment, but I was wondering if anyone out there has a list or any knowledge of the healthcare DTs that are currently being developed in the UK? I see that there are two DTs based on Hospital buildings but I was wondering if anyone knows of any DTs being built for anatomy and biological processes? Similar to Dassault's 'Living Heart project' https://www.3ds.com/products-services/simulia/solutions/life-sciences/the-living-heart-project/ Any info or links would be much appreciated! Pete winter (Sociologist of Science and Technology, University of Sheffield)
  17. I was reccently introduced to the work on Digital Twins that the City of Wellington is involved in. I share some links with the DT Hub community. Unlocking the Value of Data: Managing New Zealand’s Interconnected Infrastructure Plus, check out these links too.. which where shared with me by Sean Audain from Wellington City Council who is leading the Digital Twin activity in the city. "We have been on this trip for a while - here is an article on our approach https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/towards-city-digital-twins-sean-audain/ - the main developments since it was written was a split between the city twin and the organisational twin - something that will be formalised in the forthcoming digital strategy. To give you an idea of progress in the visualisation layer this is what the original looked like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGRBB-9jjik&feature=youtu.beback in 2017 - the new engines we are testing now look like this https://vimeo.com/427237377 - there are a bunch of improvements in the open data and in the shared data systems." I asked Sean about the impact on the DT to city leaders decision making. This is his response... "In our system we are open unless otherwise stated. We have used it as a VR experience with about 7000 wellingtonians in creating the City Resilience Strategy and Te Atakura- the Climate CHange Response and Adaptation plan. There are more descrete uses such as the proposals for the Alcohol Bylaw - https://www.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=2c4280ab60fe4ec5aae49150a46315af - this was completed a couple fo years ago and used part of the data sharing arrangements to make liquor crime data available to make decisions. I have the advantage of being a part of local government in getting civic buy in. Every time our councillors are presented with this kind of information they want more." Alcohol Control Bylaw – New
  18. Strategic planning for life after Covid-19 brings an unprecedented opportunity to change the way we view and manage our infrastructure. Mark Enzer, from CDBB makes the case for putting people first. The current pandemic has been a powerful but unforgiving teacher. It has demonstrated the importance of data and the power of digital models to derive insights from those data, to help us model outcomes, to guide the pulling of the levers to control “R” and to help us make better more-informed decisions. Covid’s disruptive impact across all sectors and societies has also revealed the interconnections and interdependencies between our economic and social infrastructure, highlighting the importance of creating resilient, sustainable and secure infrastructure systems upon which essential services depend. So why change our view of infrastructure? We have created an amazing, complex machine on which we wholly depend. Without it, our lives would be immeasurably worse. Society would not survive. That machine is infrastructure – our built environment. However, we don’t appreciate the relationship between infrastructure and our wellbeing. Therefore, we don’t set objectives in terms of outcomes for people and society. And although we understand each part of the built environment, we do not manage it as a whole. Therefore, we don’t know how to address its systemic vulnerabilities or make it work better. If we envision, plan and manage infrastructure differently, we can make it what it should truly be: A platform for human flourishing. Putting people first The Centre for Digital Built Britain (CDBB) and the Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction (CSIC) have recently published ‘Flourishing systems’, which makes the case for a people-focused systems-based vision for infrastructure. As we consider priorities following the Covid-19 outbreak, we have an opportunity to plot a new course that recognises the fundamental role of infrastructure in the social, economic and environmental outcomes that determine the quality of people’s lives. To do this, we must see infrastructure as a complex, interconnected system of systems that must deliver continuous service to society. Infrastructure is so much more than just a series of construction projects. Adopting a system-of-systems approach makes it possible to address the great systemic challenges such as achieving net-zero carbon emissions, improving resilience and preparing for a circular economy. It also unlocks the potential of digital transformation across the built environment. How digitalisation delivers value With the ongoing digital transformation of the infrastructure industry, we have the opportunity to deliver huge benefit for people – for whom infrastructure ultimately exists. Digital transformation encompasses how we function as organisations, how we deliver new assets and how we operate, maintain and use existing assets. Bringing digital and physical assets together creates cyber-physical systems – smart infrastructure. Effectively, this is applying the fourth industrial revolution to infrastructure. Making better use of asset and systems data is central to this vision because better analysis of better data enables better decisions, producing better outcomes, which is the essential promise of the information age. As part of this, we must recognise digital assets, such as data, information, algorithms and digital twins, as genuine ‘assets’, which have value and must be managed effectively and securely. In time, as data and digital assets become valued, data itself will be seen as infrastructure. We are now at a point where the vision for effective digitalisation of the whole of the built environment is within reach. Enabling secure, resilient data sharing Managing complex interconnected systems requires the appropriate tools. CDBB’s National Digital Twin programme sets out a structured approach for effective information management across the system as a whole. This approach is informed by ‘The Gemini Principles’ and is driven by the NIC’s ‘data for the public good’ report. The recent paper ‘Pathway Towards an Information Management Framework’ suggests an approach for the development of an Information Management Framework to enable secure, resilient data sharing across the built environment. It is this that will enable data connections between digital twins, which is at the heart of the concept of the ‘National Digital Twin’ – an ecosystem of connected digital twins. All systems go Taking a systems-based approach to our infrastructure will improve our ability to deliver desirable outcomes for people and society – around accessibility, inclusion, empowerment, resilience and wellbeing – not just for now but for generations to come. It will also better equip us to address the urgent global systemic challenge of climate change. It’s time to see infrastructure differently – as a system of systems that provides a platform for human flourishing. flourishing-systems_final_digital.pdf
  19. until
    As digital transformation accelerates across the built environment, Costain is collaborating across the value chain to move towards the Integrated Enterprise, connecting Digital Twins to ask complex What If questions of UK infrastructure. The focus of the 2nd series of digital twin talks is to explore the complex topic associated with the interconnection of digital twins in order to access the compound benefits that this can deliver. It cannot be expected by any solution provider, that “their” digital twin solution is one that can hope to achieve complete market monopoly given the bespoke nature of individual organisations and sectors requirements, histories and aspirations. It is, therefore, imperative that during the creation of these solutions one is considerate of design practices that are conducive in enabling the connection with other solutions [and their needs]. This practice will of course require governance but early reflection on this ambition can ultimately lower the technical hurdles that may emerge in line with potential integration frameworks.
  20. until
    Cities are complex places made up of lots of interconnected systems. Currently, policies, strategies and the digital tools that help to define them, struggle to reflect this complexity and interconnectedness. Will digital twins and the ability to federate, help cities to become more holistic in the way they plan infrastructure and services? The focus of the 2nd series of digital twin talks is to explore the complex topic associated with the interconnection of digital twins in order to access the compound benefits that this can deliver. It cannot be expected by any solution provider, that “their” digital twin solution is one that can hope to achieve complete market monopoly given the bespoke nature of individual organisations and sectors requirements, histories and aspirations. It is, therefore, imperative that during the creation of these solutions one is considerate of design practices that are conducive in enabling the connection with other solutions [and their needs]. This practice will of course require governance but early reflection on this ambition can ultimately lower the technical hurdles that may emerge in line with potential integration frameworks.
  21. until
    This talk will describe a range of applications for digital twins which represent populations and their behaviour at fine geographical scales. Insights from spatial analysis, data science and AI will be advanced in order to support decision-making across multiple inter-connected sectors and subsystems. The focus of the 2nd series of digital twin talks is to explore the complex topic associated with the interconnection of digital twins in order to access the compound benefits that this can deliver. It cannot be expected by any solution provider, that “their” digital twin solution is one that can hope to achieve complete market monopoly given the bespoke nature of individual organisations and sectors requirements, histories and aspirations. It is, therefore, imperative that during the creation of these solutions one is considerate of design practices that are conducive in enabling the connection with other solutions [and their needs]. This practice will of course require governance but early reflection on this ambition can ultimately lower the technical hurdles that may emerge in line with potential integration frameworks.
  22. until
    For the UK’s digital twin ecosystem to flourish, key decision-makers must be acutely aware of the commercial incentive structures and narratives that underpin strategic collaboration across different problem domains and time horizons. In this talk, Tom explores some of the key commercial barriers to sustainable, human-centred growth across the UK’s digital twin ecosystem and highlights ongoing work conducted by techUK’s cross-market Digital Twin Working Group (DTWG). The focus of the 2nd series of digital twin talks is to explore the complex topic associated with the interconnection of digital twins in order to access the compound benefits that this can deliver. It cannot be expected by any solution provider, that “their” digital twin solution is one that can hope to achieve complete market monopoly given the bespoke nature of individual organisations and sectors requirements, histories and aspirations. It is, therefore, imperative that during the creation of these solutions one is considerate of design practices that are conducive in enabling the connection with other solutions [and their needs]. This practice will of course require governance but early reflection on this ambition can ultimately lower the technical hurdles that may emerge in line with potential integration frameworks.
  23. DRossiter87

    Connected Pathways

    Following input from DT Hub members into a community-driven document, we have proceeded to reduce the number of use cases identified during the Pathway to Value Workshop from 28 down to 12: Open Sharing of Data Asset Registration Scenario Simulation Occupant/User Management Environmental Management Traffic Management Process Optimization Asset Management Carbon Management Resource Management Resilience Planning Risk Management Using these use cases, we can begin to explore how the National Digital Twin (NDT) programme can support members of the DT Hub in realizing their value. One way of doing so is by identifying what parts of these use cases need to be developed via the Commons Stream as part of the Information Management Framework (IMF). The reasoning being these 12 use cases are: Horizontal. Meaning that they can be applied within several sectors and their respective industries; and High-value. Meaning that they can achieve a return on investment. Positively, these use cases have a strong synergy with a similar schedule presented by Bart Brink of Royal HaskoningDHV on a recent buildingSMART webinar on digital twins. By identifying DT Hub member horizontal, high-value, use cases we hope that their associated tasks, key performance indicators and federation requirements can be recommended for prioritization as part of the development of the Information Management Framework (IMF). At the beginning of June, CDBB released The Pathway Towards an Information Management Framework: A Commons for a Digital Built Britain, a report setting out the technical approach that will lead to the development of the National Digital Twin. Within the report it focuses on three key facets that will enable secure, resilient data sharing across the built environment: Reference Data Library. A taxonomy describing a common set of classes to describe the built environment; Foundation Data Model. An ontology outlining the relation between these classes or properties of these classes; and Integration Architecture. Exchange protocols to facilitate sharing of information, using these defined classes and relations between digital twins. As opposed to being released as a complete resource, we will likely see these facets developed organically as the NDT programme continues to follow its mantra of: As such, the key question isn’t “what should these facets include?” but “what should be included first?”. We hope to answer this question using these horizontal, high-value, use cases. EXAMPLE: “Environmental management”. At the beginning of 2020, news reports focused on air pollution and its link with infrastructure. In addition, many building assets may wish to monitor air quality due to its known impact on occupant performance. As a use case that is associated to regulatory compliance, productivity, and applicable to a breadth of assets Environmental Management may be a horizontal, high-value, use case. To support such a use case, the: Reference Data Library. May need to include classes such as: Temperature, Wind speed, Humidity, CO2, and PM2.5 as well as their associated units to enable the consistent recording of this information. Foundation Data Model. May need an ontology describing acceptable ranges and the relationship of air quality concepts to other classes such as Health and Productivity depending on the function being monitored; and Integration Architecture. May need to facilitate the sharing of information from sources such as other digital twins, as well as datasets from the Met Office and local governments. Simply put, by identifying these horizontal, high-priority, use cases, we may be able to begin accelerating the realization of their value by having the taxonomies, ontologies and protocols needed to facilitate them available at an earlier stage of the overall IMF development. And there we have it. As DT Hub members begin to consider how the information management framework may support their digital twin development as well as the national digital twin, which use cases do you think are the most horizontal and high-value? How do you think these facets might support your ability to undertake these use cases? Please feel free to add your thoughts below, or, alternatively, comment directly on the draft community-driven document which is, and will continue to be, progressively developed as member views are shared.
  24. DRossiter87

    Useful Use Cases

    As the National Digital Twin (NDT) programme develops its thinking around the Commons, several resources to support the implementation of digital twins within the built environment will be developed. The first of which, the Glossary, is readily available for members to engage with. Further resources will likely include ontologies, schema and other key data infrastructure elements required to enable the NDT. To ensure that these resources are fit-for-purpose, they need to align to the needs of the DT Hub members; supporting use cases. As such, this article uses the output of the Theme 3 webinar to explore and begin to identify horizontal, high-value, use cases for prioritization. The outcome of this work will be a community-driven document (draft under development here) to inform the Commons on which use cases should be considered a priority when developing resources. During the Theme 3 webinar, a total of 28 use cases were identified by members. Open Sharing of Data Data-sharing Hub Health and Safety Social Distancing Customer Satisfaction Behavioural Change National Security Traffic Management Incident Management Efficiency Monitoring Condition Monitoring Scenario Simulations Rapid Prototyping Asset Optimization Investment Optimization Preventative Maintenance Carbon Management Service Recovery Decision Support National Efficiency ‘Live’ in-use Information Logistic / Transit Tracing Natural Environment Registration Pollution Monitoring Air Quality Monitoring Resilience Planning Resource Optimization Service Electrification This initial schedule demonstrates the breadth of value that a digital twin can facilitate. However this list can be refined as some of these use cases: Overlap and can be consolidated through the use of more careful terminology. For example both Pollution Monitoring and Air Quality Monitoring were identified. However it is likely that the system, sequence of actions, as well as any associated key performance indicators will be shared between these use cases. Therefore they could be consolidated under a single use case Environmental Monitoring. May be specific to some members or some sectors. For example, Customer Satisfaction Monitoring is a vital use case for DT Hub members who directly engage with a user-base within a supplier market (for example, utility companies and universities). However, many organizations manage assets and systems whose actors do not include a customer (for example, floor defence systems, and natural assets). Likewise, Service Electrification is a use case that is only applicable for assets and systems which rely on fossil fuels (for roads and railways). As such, while Customer Satisfaction Monitoring and Service Electrification are vital use cases which must remain within scope of the overall programme, they may not be appropriate for prioritization. Are aspects as opposed to a stand-alone use case. For example, ‘Live’ In-use Information may be a requirement of several use cases such as Traffic Management and National Security but does not in itself constitute a sequence of actions within a system. By identifying the use cases that are most common to DT Hub members as well as eliminating duplicates, it is hoped that a refined schedule can be produced; limited to high-value, horizontal use cases. Such a schedule will be valuable to: The NDT programme to understand what use cases the IMF Pathway will need to support; Asset owner/operators to identify and articulate the value-case for implementing digital twins; and Suppliers to demonstrate the validity of their software in realizing these values. Furthermore, once a streamlined schedule has been developed, further research can be undertaken to identify the typical key performance indicators used to measure and monitor systems that support these use cases. And there we have it, useful use cases. Of the 28 use cases identified which do you think are the most horizontal? Which do you think are high-value (priority) use cases? Which do you think could be aggregated together? Please feel free to add your thoughts below, or, alternatively, comment directly on the draft community-driven document which will be progressively developed as member views are shared. Feel free to comment on the content included and suggest how to refine the schedule.
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