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Delivering Outcomes

Showing all content tagged 'Benefits realisation' and posted in for the last 365 days.

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  3. Dave Murray

    Test Engineering and DTs

    I am considering starting a network for topics related to Lifecycle V&V (Validation and Verification) centred on Evaluation and Testing, and this message is to poll the level of potential interest. I imagine the network would offer the following: · A place for Test Engineers from different market sectors to share experiences and gain knowledge · Support for those areas where DT activity is low but growing, the Defence Sector is an example, to benefit from the experiences of other sectors Test Engineers have a mix of technical and customer skills that are central to successful project implementation. The DT concept provides a lifecycle project-thread that provides Test Engineers with an unprecedented opportunity to exercise their skills. Maybe finding a way to maximise this opportunity might also attract more people to the career, and be a way to improve recruitment into the world of Engineering? If we launch this Network, would you consider joining it? Dave Murray
  4. HenryFT

    Insights on performance saves money

    I completely believe this, you can't manage something you can't see
  5. TechUK’s Digital Twins Working Group (DTWG) published a landmark report- ‘Unlocking Value Across the UK’s Digital Twin Ecosystem’- on Thursday 25th February. The purpose of this report is to drive consensus around terminology, highlight key prizes associated with digital twinning across the UK, and to set out strategic recommendations for industry and Government as to how the UK’s digital twin ecosystem can progress and evolve long-term. The report also sets out a handful of recommendations, including that there should be a cross-cutting, interdisciplinary co-ordinating body to promote their use. It would identify common information requirements and capability gaps, provide guidance on codes of conduct in the use of digital twins, and develop incentives such as tax credits or innovation funding. This would come with a 10-year public investment of £150-200 million to support innovation, adoption and diffusion, and strong roles for the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). A further boost could be provided by an online procurement portal – the cost of which is estimated at up to £1.5 million – that would make digital twin offerings on the market more visible and less complex, and lead to improvements in their quality and affordability. Other recommendations are for a series of strategic demonstrator projects to show the value and identify barriers to the adoption of digital twins; to identify the skills needed to support their use; and for UKRI to run a demonstrator project on how the concept can support the aim for net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
  6. BGS and Cambridge collaborated on modelling heat flow from basements to the surrounding strata and groundwater https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0886779818309635, http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/526141/ BGS and Dr Sauer Group worked on an integrated geospatial model at Farringdon Station https://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/abs/10.1680/cpid.61293.431
  7. Webinar: Building Tomorrow’s Resilience: Why Digital Twins Are Shaping the Water Utility Status Quo Just how effective are digital twins in helping to identify critical points in your water and wastewater infrastructure—like a growing leak or an unexpected closed valve? Bentley product manager Ari Opdahl delves into the possibilities of predictive operational intelligence in this special WEF eShowcase. https://register.gotowebinar.com/recording/6892911365133001731
  8. Hi Kevin- thanks for this. Totally agree that there's a need to think bigger, longer-term and more ambitiously about the role that digital twins can play in driving sustainable innovation and experimentation. Also agree that use case generation can also be a rather siloed, static, internal process and I think there's a real need to develop some type of market mechanism or computational network to enables the sharing of actual data, software, hardware, business models etc. between DT suppliers and asset owners/ operators. This will be a particularly important task if the development of an upper ontology (thinking here of the Foundation Data Model cited in the IMF) is expected to take a while to come to fruition. Ultimately, if a strong foundation for interoperability/ interconnectivity is to be attained in the interim, DT suppliers (who I'd say largely recognise that the true value of DTs lies in their interconnections with systems and other twins) will require some form of steer/ assistance. In terms of recent examples, I'd refer here to the Royal Society’s Rapid Assistance in Modelling the Pandemic (RAMP) project, which is helping to convene different experts to join up data architectures and assist the COVID response. My questions around this initiative would be- what has worked, what hasn't, how can we keep up the pace of collaboration on data modelling under high levels of uncertainty and risk, and, ultimately, transfer the successful elements across in order to holistically apply DTs to other areas of emerging risk, such as climate change or cyber resilience? Beyond that- I think there's also a need to drive progress around the development and adoption of new value frameworks which place value on natural and social capital, not just economic capital. Natural/ social capital have been traditionally less easy to quantify and therefore integrate into traditional 'cost/ benefit' analyses. This has meant that strategic buy-in for DTs in a business context has generally focused around relatively narrow economic terms. However, as investment, regulatory and policy appetites shift, and our technical capacity to measure and track 'intangible' assets improves (e.g. advances in carbon capture technologies), I think businesses will be better placed to incorporate new value frameworks into their digital twinning journey and hope that they'll place more emphasis on how their own DT fits into the broader narrative of sustainable, resilient, human-centred growth, rather than economic growth at all costs.
  9. Steven Zhang

    Organisational Information Requirements - Free Webinar

    @iain miskimmin Thanks very much! The courses were very enlightening. The collabrative way of mindmapping also helped to reinforce learning. I am looking forward to more courses in the future.
  10. DRossiter87

    Connected Pathways

    Following input from DT Hub members into a community-driven document, we have proceeded to reduce the number of use cases identified during the Pathway to Value Workshop from 28 down to 12: Open Sharing of Data Asset Registration Scenario Simulation Occupant/User Management Environmental Management Traffic Management Process Optimization Asset Management Carbon Management Resource Management Resilience Planning Risk Management Using these use cases, we can begin to explore how the National Digital Twin (NDT) programme can support members of the DT Hub in realizing their value. One way of doing so is by identifying what parts of these use cases need to be developed via the Commons Stream as part of the Information Management Framework (IMF). The reasoning being these 12 use cases are: Horizontal. Meaning that they can be applied within several sectors and their respective industries; and High-value. Meaning that they can achieve a return on investment. Positively, these use cases have a strong synergy with a similar schedule presented by Bart Brink of Royal HaskoningDHV on a recent buildingSMART webinar on digital twins. By identifying DT Hub member horizontal, high-value, use cases we hope that their associated tasks, key performance indicators and federation requirements can be recommended for prioritization as part of the development of the Information Management Framework (IMF). At the beginning of June, CDBB released The Pathway Towards an Information Management Framework: A Commons for a Digital Built Britain, a report setting out the technical approach that will lead to the development of the National Digital Twin. Within the report it focuses on three key facets that will enable secure, resilient data sharing across the built environment: Reference Data Library. A taxonomy describing a common set of classes to describe the built environment; Foundation Data Model. An ontology outlining the relation between these classes or properties of these classes; and Integration Architecture. Exchange protocols to facilitate sharing of information, using these defined classes and relations between digital twins. As opposed to being released as a complete resource, we will likely see these facets developed organically as the NDT programme continues to follow its mantra of: As such, the key question isn’t “what should these facets include?” but “what should be included first?”. We hope to answer this question using these horizontal, high-value, use cases. EXAMPLE: “Environmental management”. At the beginning of 2020, news reports focused on air pollution and its link with infrastructure. In addition, many building assets may wish to monitor air quality due to its known impact on occupant performance. As a use case that is associated to regulatory compliance, productivity, and applicable to a breadth of assets Environmental Management may be a horizontal, high-value, use case. To support such a use case, the: Reference Data Library. May need to include classes such as: Temperature, Wind speed, Humidity, CO2, and PM2.5 as well as their associated units to enable the consistent recording of this information. Foundation Data Model. May need an ontology describing acceptable ranges and the relationship of air quality concepts to other classes such as Health and Productivity depending on the function being monitored; and Integration Architecture. May need to facilitate the sharing of information from sources such as other digital twins, as well as datasets from the Met Office and local governments. Simply put, by identifying these horizontal, high-priority, use cases, we may be able to begin accelerating the realization of their value by having the taxonomies, ontologies and protocols needed to facilitate them available at an earlier stage of the overall IMF development. And there we have it. As DT Hub members begin to consider how the information management framework may support their digital twin development as well as the national digital twin, which use cases do you think are the most horizontal and high-value? How do you think these facets might support your ability to undertake these use cases? Please feel free to add your thoughts below, or, alternatively, comment directly on the draft community-driven document which is, and will continue to be, progressively developed as member views are shared.
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