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The IMF & Connecting Digital Twins

Showing all content tagged 'Information Management Framework (IMF)', 'Ontology', 'Data quality', 'Data value', 'Data sharing', 'Data visualisation', 'Regulation', 'Ethics', 'Legal', 'Security', 'National Digital Twin', 'Interoperability', 'CReDo', 'Climate Resilience', 'Process Model based information Requirements', 'Integration Architecture', 'Industry Data Models & Reference Data', 'Foundation Data Model' and 'Top-Level Ontology' and posted in for the last 365 days.

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  2. Anglian Water is an early adopter of digital twins within the water sector, working closely with the Centre for Digital Built Britain to help develop the market and showcase how digital twins can support an organisation’s strategic outcomes. Anglian Water has a 15 year vision to develop a digital twin to sit alongside its physical assets. From an Anglian Water perspective, the Digital Twin is essentially an accurate digital representation of their physical assets, enabling insight, supporting decision making and leading to better outcomes. Aligning the digital twin objectives to Anglian Water’s regulated outcomes, as defined by the regulator OFWAT, has been a key step in developing the business case. With the initial vision and roadmap outlined the next step on the roadmap was to implement a proof of concept, to explore the value created from digital twins. Anglian Water undertook a discovery phase and a Proof of Concept with Black and Veatch for a Digital Twin back in 2019, and started to define how a Digital Twin would benefit the delivery and management of physical assets. The discovery phase looked to understand the current landscape, further enhancing the vision and roadmap, and establish persona requirements. It proved vital to really understand the organisation and the impact on people during this early exploratory work. The proof of concept looked at delivering three main outputs, focused on a pumping station to keep the scope focused and value measurable: To demonstrate an asset intelligence capability To demonstrate a visualisation capability To examine the asset data and architecture. Alongside the proof of concept other initiatives were kick started to consider how other elements of digital twin might add value, with a focus on more enhanced use of hydraulic models to explore how water networks could be further optimised. Anglian Water recognised early on that by integrating and enhancing many of the existing enterprise systems, existing investments could be leveraged and technology gaps identified. Learning from the proof of concept and other early works Anglian Water looked to the next step of the roadmap, a scaled demonstrator on the Strategic Pipeline Alliance. The Strategic Pipeline Alliance was set up to deliver up to 500km of large scale pipeline, and alongside this to start defining and delivering the first phase of the digital twin. SPA has a 2025 vision is to deliver a large-scale, holistically linked water transfer resilience system. This will be operated, performance managed and maintained using advanced digital technology. The SPA team set about developing a digital twin strategy which is based on the wider corporate vision and enhances the proof of concept work. The basic premise of the SPA digital twin is to integrate traditionally siloed business functions and systems, to deliver enhanced capability across the asset lifecycle. As with Anglian Water the SPA strategy is focused on using the technology available and developing a robust enterprise, integration, and data architecture to create a foundation for digital twin. Taking this a step further it was decided to adopt a product based approach, thinking about the development of digital twin products aligned to physical assets, that could be re-used across the wider Anglian Water enterprise. This whole life product based approach threw up some interesting challenges, namely how to build a business case that delivered benefit to SPA and also enabled Anglian Water’s future ambitions, taking a lifecycle view of the value delivered. To achieve this meant considering and assessing the value to both SPA during the capital delivery phase and Anglian Water during the operational phases. This process also highlighted that certain elements of the digital twin deliver value to both SPA and Anglian Water equally and could therefore be considered as a shared benefit. The resulting benefits register helped to identify the value delivered to the alliance partners which was vital to securing the delivery board sign off. As Anglian Water are a partner in the alliance, the ability to demonstrate value in the operational phase with SPA developing the technical foundation, was another key element in securing the investment. As part of the overall process the SPA board were keen to see how the investment would be allocated, therefore the strategy evolved to incorporate the capabilities to be developed within SPA to enable digital twin. This helped to inform and validate the team for digital twin delivery. With the capabilities and organisational chart resolved, a governance framework was put into place to allow the digital twin evolution to be managed effectively, putting in place the right checks and balances. This has included input and oversight from the wider Anglian Water team as ultimately, they will be responsible for managing the various digital twins long term. To validate the digital twin against the SPA outcomes and objectives, the various elements of the digital twin were incorporated into the overall enterprise architecture. This has proved to be an important part of the process to ensure alignment to the wider capabilities and importantly ensure the right technology is in place. The enterprise architecture continues to evolve to include information objects below the application layer, again building on the product based approach, so that the enterprise architecture can be utilised in the wider Anglian Water Alliances. In total the development of the strategy, business case and capabilities has taken 6 months, however it is important to note that this builds on the earlier proof of concept and ideation during the initial mobilisation of SPA. Given the approach a key next step is to work with Anglian Water to explore accelerated deployment of SPA digital twins on other major schemes, to put to test the product approach and maximise the investment made. We have learnt from the early developments on SPA that articulating a whole life view of value is vital and that focusing on capital / operational stages is equally important, so that appropriate budget holders can see the value being delivered. We have also learnt the importance of having a bold vision which must be matched by clear definition of the first few steps, showing a long term roadmap for achieving an enterprise digital twin. What is certainly clear is that we still have a lot to learn, however by following good architectural best practice and placing people and our environment at the heart of digital twin, we have put in place a good foundation from which to build. If you would like to know more, please get in touch through the DT Hub.
  3. Visual intelligence is the ability to capture, connect and communicate information about spaces in real time. Then to instantly transform it through visualisation techniques into accurate, accessible, actionable data useable by anyone that needs. A process embedded in the simple digital twin but enabled by emerging technologies, specifically the digital integration between devices, enhanced by immersive technology and artificial intelligence. Think of visual intelligence as a compass. Without it, a vessel can’t make the most of its assets, is uncertain where it’s headed, how it will be impacted by the environment and how it can reach its destination with maximum efficiency and care for its crew. Businesses have to take certain actions to increase ROI, communicate to and manage disparate teams, automate with confidence, set out clear directions and grow faster. Connected and integrated data translated into visual intelligence enables these actions. It is the compass. Attached are some insight from a few companies who started with a simple digital twin – a connection of data – but who have embraced visual intelligence and what it means for them National Digital Twin presentation (1.1).pdf
  4. Bringing CreDo to life With COP26 on the horizon, we are fully immersed in preparing to showcase the Climate Resilience Demonstrator - CReDo. We have appointed two partners to help us communicate the story in an engaging and inspiring way and demonstrate the huge potential of information sharing. Firstly, we are working with Crocodile Media to develop a short, dramatic film that will tell the story of a flooding event and how connected digital twins may provide a better response to climate disasters. The second partnership is with ESRI, a provider of online maps and 3D models of cities, who are developing an interactive demonstrator that will allow the public to test out various scenarios on a made-up city. The purpose of both will be to demonstrate how information sharing across organisational boundaries is a key enabler to improving resilience of infrastructure systems. We have organised an event “Increasing our climate resilience through connected digital twins” on the 2nd of Nov to watch the film, see the interactive tool in action and find out more about how connected digital twins can help to tackle climate change. We’re delighted that the project doesn’t end with COP26 – instead, the technical development of CReDo will continue until next year and will be delivered through a collaboration of research centres and industry partners; The Universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Exeter, Newcastle and Warwick will work alongside the Hartree Centre, DAFNI, Science and Technology Facilities Council, CMCL Innovations, the Joint Centre of Excellence in Environmental Intelligence, CPNI and Mott MacDonald. We are also delighted to be working in partnership with three major UK utility providers; Anglian Water, BT and UK Power Networks who are equally committed to making bold steps towards resilient infrastructure. Progress on IMF’s seven circles We have been moving forward with all seven circles of the Information Management Framework from top level ontologies, to integration architecture to information quality management. One document I particularly want to highlight is ‘Managing Shared Data’, an exciting piece of work being developed by @Matthew West, Technical Lead for the NDTp. He is bringing together the lessons we’ve learned over the past three years since publication of the Pathway toward an IMF report and providing clarity on what it means for organisations to manage information effectively, an essential enabler for connecting digital twin. It is in development and we’re hoping to release the final document by the end of the year. DT Hub There are three main activities to highlight for October: DT Hub website update. We’re keen to keep improving the useability and layout of the site so the new version of the DT Hub will include a public facing page, with all the resources to make it easier to access public documents. It also includes a page to host all information related to CReDo. DT Roadblocks workshop series. As the community progresses on their digital twin journeys, it is inevitable there will be a myriad of challenges. The great aspect of being part of a community is that there are others who have faced similar challenges and can share their learnings or provide insights in to how to overcome your particular hurdle. Our first workshop is aptly named, “Problems shared, problems halved”. If you would like to be part of a constructive discussion, do sign up to this series, running until the end of the year. Smart Infrastructure Index. We have just launched our latest SII survey to enable members to measure their digital maturity and benchmark progress against peers. When members complete and submit the survey, the SII will generate a personalised report including a score and targeted recommendations. The idea is that it enables users to identify areas for improvement and to support the prioritisation of future activities. The survey is open until mid-November and can be accessed here.
  5. Alexandra Robasto

    Bring out your Digital Twin Challenges!

    @iain miskimminthere is a follow up workshop to focus on prioritising challenges. This will be held later this month. Katie will get in touch soon.
  6. Danny Murguia

    Network FOuNTAIN Online Survey

    Information ontologies and management in a digitised built environment The Network FOuNTAIN is inviting professionals in the AEC industry to participate in our survey that investigates the role of information ontologies and management for a digitised built environment. If you have experience in managing digital information, help us understand the level of adoption of information ontologies and information management activities and their relationship with performance outcomes. To access our survey please click here: https://lboro.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/network-fountain-survey. For comments and feedback please contact the Principal Investigator, Dr Peter Demian, at P.Demian@lboro.ac.uk.
  7. until
    The Climate Resilience Demonstrator (CReDo) project from the National Digital Twin programme is holding a webinar to launch the project to a global audience in conjunction with the COP26 climate conference on 2nd November at 10:30-12. This webinar replaces the weekly Gemini Call, and the DT Hub community are encouraged to sign up, as well as inviting their wider networks to attend. The climate emergency is here now, and connected digital twins are an important part of achieving net zero and climate resilience. The CReDo team will present how the project meets this urgent need, and will premiere two exciting outputs – a short film and an interactive visualisation of how connected data across three infrastructure networks can provide better insights and lead to better resilience of the system-of-systems overall. Only if we come together to securely share data across sectors can we plan a smarter, greener, more resilient built environment. Book your spot today! Keep an eye on the DT Hub website for updates about the CReDo programme.
  8. Catherine Condie

    Smart Infrastructure Index Survey 2021 now open!

    We are inviting you to complete our 2021 Smart Infrastructure Index© Survey with a special focus on digital twins. Twelve months on from the release of our first version of the Index survey for asset owners and operators, we are broadening our reach so that our digital twin question set is relevant to all DT Hub members. The Smart Infrastructure Index is a user-friendly way for DT Hub members to measure digital maturity and benchmark progress against peers.  Understand your digital maturity using a proven methodology  Identify capability gaps and priorities in your digital roadmap  Benchmark performance against peers and learn from the best  Start your Smart Infrastructure Index Survey here. We will process entries until mid-November 2021. Once you have completed the survey, don’t forget to fill in your name and organisation to receive your personalised report including a score and targeted recommendations. These will be sent straight to your DT Hub email inbox. In the weeks that follow, we will analyse all responses and send everyone a full industry report. Benefits of completing the survey For individuals: Instant, personalised results sent direct to your email inbox; see how your score compares to the sector average and best practice; view your tailored strategic recommendations; identify which archetype you are (optimist, traditionalist etc.) For organisations: Measure your digital maturity; identify what to prioritise; benchmark against the best Why should industry complete the Index? Index insights highlight common challenges, recommendations provide solutions to these challenges; benchmarking helps identify best practice, case studies can be shared; industry-wide capability gaps addressed as a priority Digital twin focus The DT Hub and Mott MacDonald Digital Ventures have worked together to bolster the standard Index of seven categories, with an additional question set for those working on the delivery of a major project or programme, and a question set that revolves around digital twins. The digital twin questions are designed specifically for members of the DT Hub and ask about: Digital twins Customers Commercial Digital transformation Asset management Asset delivery Asset performance Continuous improvement When members complete the survey, the Index will generate a personalised report including a score and targeted recommendations, sent straight to their DT Hub email inbox after completion. Read the 2020 Index Survey Summary and watch the Interview
  9. The Open Geospatial Consortium, an open standards consortium with an experimental innovation arm, invites digital twin enthusiasts to evaluate the use of APIs and web services to connect to a variety of information resources in the built environment. https://www.ogc.org/projects/initiatives/idbepilot At this stage, we are after use cases, ideas, datasets and establish the requirements for a 4 months pilot. Use cases may include Building Condition Assessments across larger portfolios and evaluating building occupancy under certain constraints such as social distancing. Response period ends September 30st, 2021.
  10. until
    About the event Creating the products that will lead the delivery of true net zero will require transformational change in the product engineering, assurance, and production process. Innovative integration across the entire product, service and infrastructure enterprise will be essential to deliver the ambitious levels of performance that customers, society, and the environmental imperative demand. Digitalisation offers an opportunity to unlock transformation of our industrial system and is a core enabler to ensuring that the UK plays a dominant role in the definition of future mobility solutions. Novel information and data management systems will facilitate the ability to integrate the product & service enterprise across the entire value chain - essential if technology is to be exploited effectively. Digitalisation offers the potential to “democratise excellence” across the entire supply base and across our broad national industrial footprint. In this session, led by experts from the Institute of Digital Engineering, we look at one of today’s top technology trends, Digital Twins, and how it’s changing the way businesses operate, the customer experience, and its contribution to cleaner, more efficient, and safer products and services. But what is exactly is a digital twin and how can it add value? Is this the key to sustainability and future economic success, or is it just the new toy on the market? Speakers for this event include: Mark Enzer OBE, Head of National Digital Twin programme (CDBB), Chief Technical Officer at Mott MacDonald Jose Garcia-Urruchi, Head of Digital Engineering Capability - Jaguar Land Rover Peter Van Manen, Principal Consultant - Frazer-Nash Consultancy Louise Krug, Technical Lead – BT Bradley Yorke-Biggs, CEO & Professor of Practice – Institute of Digital Engineering IDE UK Register for this free webinar at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/road-to-cop26-digitalisation-tickets-168562441801
  11. Katie Walsh

    Defining Our Digital Twin Challenges!

    Creating Digital Twins can be like sailing in uncharted waters, so how do you handle it when unforeseen challenges rock the boat? Can you even predict what kinds of things will disrupt your journey? We’ve noticed in various conversations on the DT Hub that no matter what sort of Digital Twin you’re trying to set up or why, there is an incredibly wide range of potential disruptions. From technical to cultural, from resources to supply chains, almost every avenue is susceptible to producing a challenge somewhere. Many examples that we’ve already seen have only become apparent once the people developing Digital Twins are up against them in real time, so that’s why the DT Hub has launched this new activity, Defining Our Digital Twin Challenges! We would like to know about the challenges you’ve encountered on your DT journey in order to make the overall roadmap easier to follow. The information you provide will help us to ultimately define our common challenges so we can start to solve them together. This series of thematic workshops, run by the DT Hub, will progress the conversation around the Digital Twin Journey, and surface some of the challenges that organisations are still facing whilst embarking on their journey. Each Challenge will culminate in an Activity, where we will present the specific challenge areas that you have brought to us to a select group in order to provide constructive feedback. The outcome of these workshops will be to share insights from inside and outside the community for the benefit of the community as a whole. You can use this activity Bring out your Digital Twin Challenges to explore your challenges with others, and our crowd facilitator, Joao, will be interacting with you to make sure you get the best experience possible. Joao is a former market researcher, court interpreter and has been a brilliant member of our team for years as a 100%Open Associate. We look forward to your invaluable contributions, and in turn the exponential development of the DT journey.
  12. Hi @Mike Wood The event is taking place next week on Tuesday September 14th from 09:30-11:00. The event is free and you can register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/road-to-cop26-digitalisation-tickets-168562441801 We hope you can join! All the best, Sunniva Skorve
  13. Peter El Hajj

    Describing a digital twin - seeking feedback

    Hi @Rich - I think testing "what ifs" scenarios is the prime feature or use case of digital twins. The scenarios could be to intervene on the physical (preventative maintenance schedule) or to prepare for an event in the future (responses to components failure or disaster on infrastructure systems). I think the main way to know if the intervention is having the intended outcome is build in all digital twins a feedback loop. Depending on the scale of the DT (component, system, system-of-systems) the feedback loop (data input) might look very different and is captured differently. It would be practically easier to assess the performance of a maintenance regime on components of a train, then to determine if the extension of a new road has improved the productivity and social outcomes for a city (but this is very important). Federation and enabling digital twins interoperability is key, and I think this point on checking if the DT delivered better outcomes emphasises this as feedback data might not come from the same digital twin that did the intervention, but from a different digital twin owned by a different organisation.
  14. Since its creation in 2018, the National Digital Twin programme (NDTp) has had three objectives: Enable a National Digital Twin – an ecosystem of connected digital twins to foster better outcomes from our built environment Deliver an Information Management Framework – ensure secure resilient data sharing and effective information management Align a Digital Framework Task Group to [provide coordination and alignment among key players. In 2021 and with the Digital Framework Task Group of senior leaders from industry, academia and government overseeing progress, it is at a point where key projects are being realised and support for its work is gathering momentum. Here is a summary of the latest developments. The Digital Twin Hub community is now in excess of 2,000 members and its remit to create technical foundations and to provide a co-ordinated community in which to share expertise and knowhow on digital twins is being met with enthusiasm and support from a diverse range of participants across the UK and beyond. This year is proving pivotal in terms of active engagement with our members to better understand their digital maturity and needs, especially through surveys, community activities and international summits. And in parallel is the publication of key documents and resources including the Digital Twin Toolkit and upcoming Collaborative Workshop to help companies make their business cases, and the Digital Twin Standards roadmap, a culmination of work by the British Standards Institute (BSI), which enables a framework for information management and sets out our programme for the next few years. Key to these activities is the willingness of members from both academic and industrial fields to share their own knowledge and experiences. The DT Hub is launching a new series titled Digital Twin Journeys to focus on academic research and lessons learned from digital twin projects focused on construction: buildings, infrastructure and industrial, and satellite applications. In parallel, we will engage with industry to run a consultation on our Flex 260 Standards as well as a second Smart Infrastructure Index (SII) Survey which tracks, in the first instance, digital and organisational maturity levels of asset owner and operator members. At the end of August, we also announced the launch of three thematic workshops to address Digital Twin Roadblocks by progressing the conversation and surfacing the challenges faced by organisations while embarking on their digital twin journeys. The aim is for members to discuss experiences and to elicit the main challenges and blockers encountered in their programmes to date. These monthly workshops will commence at the end of September 2021. Our work on the Information Management Framework, to allow the smooth adoption of digital twin technologies, has also gathered pace with the introduction of a methodology to divide the information management space into manageable segments. The 7 circles approach provides the building blocks for informed decision making and will deliver better information management and information sharing on a national scale. The NDTp’s CReDo project will be running a webinar on 2 November 2021 to coincide with COP26 to give insight into our plans to develop a digital twin across water, energy and telecoms to improve resilience across the infrastructure system. CReDo – Climate Resilience Demonstrator – is applying an Information Management Framework approach to share data across water, energy and telecoms service providers, combined with hydrology and climate data from the Met Office, to help plan for and adapt to the cascading effects of increased flooding due to climate change. Registration for the webinar will be opening soon.
  15. I'm attaching here my slides from the 24 August Gemini Call introducing the Digital Twin Journeys project. GeminiCall_DigitalTwinJourneys.pptx
  16. Peter El Hajj

    NDTp Editorial, August 2021

    The summer was marked by our milestone event, the Cyber-Physical Fabric Summit, which took place on July 19th. It was a huge success with more than 800 people registered, and close to 400 people on the live calls and a series of insightful roundtable discussions. There was a live Zoom chat running in parallel to the summit, with the comments every bit as engaging as the content. Each roundtable had a further thread on the DT Hub to ensure that others could catch up on the discussion. The summit was not only useful in terms of pooling knowledge and ideas, but in creating movement towards the shared goal of developing an ecosystem of interconnected smart machines and digital twins. It left me feeling energized to hear from others who are equally excited about this journey and to have a cross section of academia, government and industry take part. The main takeaways for me were: The need for boundary spanning leadership. Our speakers underlined the importance of taking an interconnected and collaborative approach to working across sectors, industries and organisations. I liked the analogy of an octopus – something that joins the intelligent tentacles and makes them work together. Deep socio. In the same way that we have ‘deep tech’, there was a lot of discussion around ‘deep socio’ and ensuring the social side of creating our cyber physical fabric has equal weight to the tech side. There is a real need to address issues around ethics, privacy and commercial and regulatory requirements. Creating and adopting in tandem. It was great to see so much consensus around the importance of adoption. We need to constantly be implementing the latest research, so we can test and refine as we go along. Living labs. There was discussion around how we need to keep testing what we’ve created to really see what is working and what isn’t and what the impact is on real people. There’s a really interesting example taking place at MIT where their Living Labs programme is developing a scalable data management platform, allowing them to collect and integrate multiple types of data including: personal data or “small data” (collected by smart phones, activity tracking devices, or new wearable sensors); MIT data (wifi data, campus maps, event data etc); as well as external data types (social media data, transportation data, weather, city data etc). A further example worth following is the Smart Mobility Living Lab London where they are using smart mobility living as a test-bed for data innovation. DT Hub We continue to grow fast and have crossed the 2,000 member mark. We now have members from more than 1,000 individual organisations across 60 different countries. There has also been an increase in participation with many more new postings and threads being generated by our members. Do log on to add to the discussions! Also look out for our Flex 260 Standards, which opens for public consultation. Again we really value your feedback. As we grow, so does our need for additional staff and I’m delighted to welcome two great additions to the team: @Kirsten Lamband @Catherine Condie. Both come with a wealth of experience and will be driving our communications and engagement activities across the programme. CreDo Update CReDo, the Climate Resilience Demonstrator, is a climate change adaptation digital twin demonstrator project to improve resilience across infrastructure systems. We launched a new DTHub page for CReDo where we will be sharing progress and the benefits of cross sectoral information sharing to improve climate resilience across infrastructure. We are exploring examples of interdependencies map for infrastructure systems. Check out this thread and share any thoughts you might have. An important part of our Credo programme is communicating the technology and research to a diverse audience in an inspiring way. We have tenders out to create a video and would be grateful if you could circulate the following with your network
  17. Sue

    Planning Golden Thread

    I agree, this is an unfortunate choice of phrase to describe a really important development in construction. Between 2010 and 2017 the term 'golden thread' was routinely used to describe the inclusion of sustainable development in the planning process - now the same phrase is being used to describe an emerging legal requirement to maintain secure data about specific subjects through the life of a project. It is likely to be very confusing for planning practitioners! Good point.
  18. Ioana R

    Digital twin Internship

    Hello 🖐️ I am an Architecture Graduate, interested in Digital Twin, also looking for an internship. I would appreciate if anyone knows companies that recruit in this domain. Thank you ! 🙃
  19. A4I round 6 launches tomorrow, 29/07/2021. This funding is aimed at SMEs looking to solve analysis or measurement problems. Below are some example ideas which might be eligible for A4I funding, and relevant to Digital Twin development: Collection of real-time data Accessing new sensing technologies, analytical tools & methodologies for input into Digital Twins Data analysis techniques Developing new analytical techniques or systems to improve existing Digital Twins e.g. data quality verification, or generating new insights using AI. Measurement of Digital Twin performance Note that this is a fast tracked funding round so please pay close attention to the closing dates. Link to the full information on the A4I funding: https://apply-for-innovation-funding.service.gov.uk/competition/975/overview For projects requiring Hartree Centre capabilities (AI, Data Science, HPC) you can also contact me directly to discuss the project and funding submission process. Examples of previous A4I projects: https://www.a4i.info/a4i_case_studies/data-performance-consultancy-limited/?bpage=1 https://www.a4i.info/a4i_case_studies/riskaware/?bpage=1 Summary:
  20. The building stock is a city’s most significant socio-cultural and economic resource and its largest capital asset. Buildings are also where we spend most of our lives and most of our money, and where enormous potential for energy and waste reduction lies. To help improve the quality, sustainability and resilience of building stocks, and to help reduce emissions from them, comprehensive information on their composition, operation and dynamic behaviour are required. However in many countries relevant data are extremely difficult to obtain, often highly fragmented, restricted, missing or only available in aggregated form. Colouring Cities sets out to address this issue. The initiative develops open code to facilitate the construction and management of low cost public databases, which double as knowledge exchange platforms, providing open data on buildings, at building level. These are provided to answer questions such as: How many buildings do we have? Which building types, uses, construction systems, ages, styles and sizes are located where? How repairable, adaptable and extendable are they? How long can they last if properly maintained? How energy efficient are they? Can they easily be retrofitted? Who built them and what is their ownership type, and how well do local communities think they work? Colouring Cities also looks to advance a more efficient, whole-of-society approach to knowledge sharing on buildings and cities, allowing for permanent databases to be collaboratively maintained and enriched, year-on-year, by citizens, academia, government, industry and the voluntary sector. Colouring London https://colouringlondon.org/, our live prototype, has been built and tested over the past five years using a step-by-step collaborative approach which has involved consultation with academia, government, industry, the voluntary sector and the community (working across science, the humanities and the arts). It looks to test four approaches to data provision-collation of existing open uploads, computational generation, local crowdsourcing and live streaming. In 2020 the Colouring Cities Research Programme was set up at The Alan Turing Institute to support international research institutions wishing to reproduce and co-work on Colouring Cities code at city or country level. We are currently collaborating with academic partners in Lebanon, Bahrain, Australia, Germany and Greece and Switzerland. Watch the Hub Insight to learn more about the project and the opportunity to get involved. If you'd like to get involved please do test our site and add any recommendations for features you would like in our discussion thread https://discuss.colouring.london/. Or, if you are a public body or DTHub industry member wishing to increase open access to your infrastructure datasets, and/or to digital twin visualisations, relating to the building stock, please contact Polly Hudson at Turing. Find out more:
  21. If you read carefully the DT promotion documents is all about only the capitalist VC and Ivory Tower academic research supported and NOTHING FOR GENERAL PUBLIC. VIVA BREXIT - NO ANY TECH infrastructure support for SME and innovative communities.
  22. Does this help? Elevator pitch (also known as an elevator speech) is a short, persuasive speech you use to introduce yourself, your product, or your company. Its purpose is to explain the concept quickly and clearly to spark interest in who you are and what you do.
  23. Matthew West, Technical Lead, National Digital Twin Programme, introduces a video on the 7 circles of Information Management and Process Model Information Requirements. Join Matthew and Al Cook, a member of the technical team of the NDTp and an expert in data integration activities and information security, as they take you through key elements of the Information Management Framework and detail a new approach to effective information management. A video is available to view below, with a live Q&A session from 10:00 to 10:30 on Thursday 15 July 2021. Access to quality and well-managed information in organisations is key to support decision making and optimise outcomes at all levels. Decisions based on poor quality information, or no information at all, can significantly increase the risk of mistakes or even disasters. Systematically implementing information management ensures the ability to deliver the right information to the right decision-makers, at the right time. It is a critical success factor for the National Digital Twin (NDT), an ecosystem of connected Digital Twins where high-quality data is shared securely, on a massive scale to improve decision making across the UK. The “7 circles of Information Management”: developing the Information Management Framework The Information Management Framework (IMF), a collection of open, technical and non-technical standards, guidance and common resources, is intended to enable better information management and information sharing at a national scale and provide the building blocks to be (re)used by those wishing to be part of the NDT. The scope of the IMF is broad and the “7 circles diagram” that I introduce in the video below is a pragmatic way to divide the Information Management space into areas of concern that can be addressed separately as well as supporting each other. It is intended to help identify areas and associated NDTp deliverables that are of particular relevance to you. The technical aspects of the IMF may come first to your mind. On top of “information transport” mechanisms, together with authorisation and security protocols, to ensure that information can be accessed seamlessly, the NDT needs a language, an inter-lingua, so that data can be shared consistently and used to support decisions without requiring any further “data wrangling”. To develop this common language (the NDT’s ontology) the team is pursuing a principled approach, deeply grounded in mathematics and science to ensure that it is as extensible and all-encompassing as possible. This is what the deepest circles of the 7 circles diagram are about. There is, however, much more to the Information Management Framework than the purely technical aspects, and as part of the highest circles of the 7 circles diagram, we are developing guidance on how to systematically improve information management so that producing data that meets the quality standards required to be part of the NDT becomes part of “business as usual”. A first step towards better information management: defining your information requirements This means that while the NDT’s ontology is being developed, steps can be taken to work towards better information management. Organisations need to reach a point of recognition that there is a need to address data quality in a way that enables improved decisions within their own business and with those they have data-based relationships with. And defining Information Requirements (the second circle in the stack) is a key starting point. Process Model based Information Requirements Too often, information requirements are incomplete or even absent in organisations, with the implication that if requirements are not identified and agreed there is no reason that they would be met. As part of the second circle of the “7 circles diagram”, the team has released a paper outlining the proposed approach to developing information requirements, based on the analysis of process models. This is a novel approach, ensuring the systematic identification of information needed (no more, no less) to support decisions and to identify where it is captured. I encourage you to watch Al Cook’s presentation in the second part of the video to find out more about this approach. The team and I hope to share more detailed guidance on information management in the near future, helping you to assess your organisation’s current information management maturity, prioritise areas for obvious improvements in decision-making and start addressing them, so that mistakes can be avoided and better outcomes achieved. And as we continue to further develop the Information Management Framework, we look forward to accompanying you through the discovery of other circles among the 7 circles of Information Management. This video contains an introduction to the 7 circles of Information Management presented by Matthew West followed by a presentation by Al Cook on a suggested approach to define information requirements. Al and Matthew look forward to answering your questions and talking about next steps in a live Q&A session on the DT Hub, on the 15/07 from 10:00 to 10:30.
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    Delivering the UK National Digital Twin programme - progress and what next? by @Simon Evans, Digital Energy Leader, Arup and Chair of the Gemini Call, National Digital Twin Programme. Book tickets here: Achieving Asset Availability: Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability | Live Online | SEM7336 (imeche.org)
  25. The pandemic has highlighted the need to make better, data-driven decisions that are focused on creating better outcomes. It has shown how digital technologies and the data that drives them are key to putting the right information in the right hands at the right time to ensure that we make the right decision to achieve the right outcomes. Connected ecosystems of digital twins, part of the cyber physical fabric, will allow us to share data across sectors, in a secure and resilient fashion, to ensure that we can make those important decisions for the outcomes that we need. They provide us with a transformative tool to tackle the major issues of our time, such as climate change, global healthcare and food inequality. We must use digital twins for the public good, as set out in “Data for the Public Good”, and we must also use those digital twins to create a better future for people and the planet. The recent publication of the Vision for the Built Environment sets out a pioneering vision for the built environment, and we want to see that vision expanded further, to include other sectors, such as health, education, manufacturing and agriculture. As the UK considers what a national digital twin might look like, we draw on the experience of the past three years to add to the discussion. A UK national digital twin must have a purpose-built delivery vehicle that works through coordination, alignment and collaboration. It needs to bring together those working in the field, across sectors, across industries, and across government departments. It must balance the need for research, both within academic institutions and industry, with the industry implementation and adoption that is already underway. And it must ensure that the programme is socio-technical in nature; if we concentrate solely on the technical factors, while failing to address the equally important social considerations, we risk creating a solution that cannot or will not be adopted – a beautiful, shiny, perfect piece of ‘tech’ that sits on a shelf gathering dust. There are many in the UK doing fantastic work in the digital twin space, and the wider cyber-physical fabric of which connected digital twins are a part. We know from experience that we get much better outcomes when we work together as a diverse team, rather than in siloes which lead to fragmentation. Industry is already creating digital twins and connecting them to form ecosystems. If we are to avoid divergence, we have to act now. To start the discussion and allow the sharing of thoughts and experience, the Royal Academy of Engineering has convened an open summit, hosted by the DT Hub on the 19th July from 10:00 – 16:00. The day will start with an introduction laying out the opportunities and challenges we face as a nation and as a planet. This will be followed by four expert-led panels, each with a Q&A session. The first is chaired by Paul Clarke CBE on the cyber physical fabric; followed by a panel on data and technical interoperability chaired by Professor Dame Wendy Hall; after lunch, Professor David Lane CBE will chair a panel on research; followed by a panel on adoption chaired by Mark Enzer OBE. The four panel chairs will convene a final plenary session. I do hope you will join us, to hear the experiences of others and to add your own expertise and knowledge to the conversation. To register for the Summit, click here.
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